first_imgThe threat goes beyond the loss of jobs, the loss of research and development tied to manufacturing, and the loss of control of an emerging industry.With growing use of Internet-connected smart technology in solar panels, having China produce and control a key energy source poses a potential national energy and cybersecurity threat.Unfortunately, the recommendations made by the ITC don’t go far enough to make up for all the damage.Our proposal for a real remedy includes tariffs as well as a minimum price for cells and modules that will make it possible for Suniva and others to start opening plants and putting people back to work in good-paying, middle-class jobs.Now that he has returned from China, Trump should deliver a strong message: American solar must compete on equal footing.Matt Card is executive vice president at Suniva, a Georgia-based solar cell and module manufacturing company.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Winning before the ITC mattered, but ultimately it is up to Trump to impose a remedy that works, and unfortunately the watered-down recommendations sent to him by the commissioners don’t do enough.Different commissioners supported different plans, which include a mix of tariffs and quotas at various levels, but all of them fell short of the stronger tariffs and quotas we know are needed to reopen factories and eventually invest in new ones to save this high-tech American manufacturing sector.To get their way, Chinese companies have joined and influenced American trade groups, resulting in a concerted lobbying and advertising campaign against an effective remedy.(Suniva has a mix of both domestic and foreign investment including from Shunfeng International Clean Energy Ltd., a Chinese company that acquired 63 percent of our firm in 2015..We think it is better to have a mix of foreign and domestic ownership employing American workers here than it is to outsource Americans jobs.)With earlier ITC rulings, China skirted past tariffs by moving companies and factories to proxy countries, laughing at the United States and continuing to steal American jobs.That’s why we filed the 201 complaint — to give the president the ability to say, “Enough is enough, we’re going to enforce fair trade and ensure American manufacturers get to compete on even footing.” Categories: Editorial, OpinionPresident Donald Trump is right to take on our national trade imbalance with China.For too long, millions of American jobs and thousands of factories have disappeared as other countries, particularly China, game the system, break the rules and flood the U.S. market with below-cost imports that are breaking the back of American manufacturing.I’ve seen it happen in the solar cell and module industry.Our company alone had to lay off hundreds of employees this spring because we can’t keep up with Chinese imports.Sadly, that same scenario has played out in nearly 30 solar manufacturing companies over the past five years – costing thousands of U.S. jobs and about $1 billion in investments. Beginning in 2006, the Chinese government has made dominating the solar industry part of its five-year economic plans, and has aggressively subsidized their manufacturers so they could sell products below what it costs to make them.Since that moment, the United States has gone from a trade surplus on this American-invented technology to a more than $8 billion annual trade deficit.We operate in the United States in a fair market, expected to make a profit and stand on our own two feet.That’s what we did, planning, always improving the technology we helped develop locally at Georgia Tech, and working with local communities where we built our plants in Norcross, Ga., and Saginaw, Mich.We did it right. But China cheated.Through hacking of U.S. companies, the theft of technology secrets and forcing prices to drop, they have all but finished off America’s solar manufacturing industry.As a result, countries the size of Montana now have more manufacturing capacity in solar than the United States does. I don’t want to keep seeing good, hardworking Americans continue to hear the same thing.And thankfully, we have a president who is willing to be tough to create fair and reciprocal trade for U.S. manufacturers.He is in the right place at the right time, and his recent visit to China couldn’t have come at a better moment.This month, the International Trade Commission (ITC) voted on remedy recommendations for Trump so he can bring U.S. solar manufacturing back to life.The commission had already ruled unanimously that cheap solar imports have flooded the U.S. market and caused significant injury, driving an entire industrial segment to the brink of extinction.The ruling and recommendations came as a result of a complaint under Section 201 of the Trade Act we filed at Suniva, joined by SolarWorld Americas — the two largest remaining U.S. solar cell and module manufacturing companies.At one time, my company employed 350 people in four states.last_img read more

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Is there anyone else who sees the hypocrisy and lunacy of teachers’ principles and so-called government “officials” backing and promoting the children of America to riot in the streets for “gun control?”It’s very obvious to me that these children can’t be spokespeople for causes such as this. However, they’re being used as pawns to exploit this confiscation of guns, which dictators in government usually do to take over a country. Can these children get this? Can they see to understand what is truly involved in all this? Stop and consider the teen years, will you? Teens, and I used to be one, think they know everything. They can’t see past the end of their noses because they aren’t educated by life in the real world. Yet, the liberal media and left-wing radicals exploit their passion and lead them astray like dumb sheep. I would say that these people responsible for this should be ashamed of themselves, but most of them have no conscience left towards truth, just the failed policies of liberals, communists and progressives. I hate adults who use kids for their purposes!Barry GroatSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlinelast_img read more

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first_imgLOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Tiffani Afifa is a K-pop fan and influencer, and even the alarming spread of the novel coronavirus in South Korea has not dissuaded her from visiting the country.Last Saturday, one day before South Korea’s government announced the highest possible alert level over the virus, Tiffani flew to Seoul with her friends for a one-week vacation.“Before I went, I was told by a lot of people about the possibility of quarantine as soon as I arrived at the airport. Turns out, it was just business as usual at the airport as well as within Seoul,” Tiffani told The Jakarta Post via instant messaging.As a K-Pop enthusiast, the 30-year-old goes to South Korea two to five times a year. “The difference now is that I think almost 95 percent of the people [in Seoul] are wearing masks, and some places are less crowded than usual, for example Hongdae,&rdq… South-Korea kpop fans Topics : Log in with your social account Linkedin Forgot Password ? Facebooklast_img read more

first_img“This is not a drill,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters. “This epidemic is a threat for every country, rich and poor.”Tedros called on the heads of government in every country to take charge of the response and “coordinate all sectors”, rather than leaving it to health ministries.What is needed, he said, is “aggressive preparedness.”In the United States, the largest nursing union said a survey of thousands of nurses at hospitals showed “truly disturbing” results.”They show that a large percentage of our nation’s hospitals are unprepared to safely handle COVID-19,” said Jane Thomason, a hygiene specialist with the union.Nurses are working without necessary personal protective equipment and lack education and training for handling the disease, said National Nurses United director Bonnie Castillo. The epidemic has wreaked havoc on international business, tourism, sports events, and schools, with almost 300 million students sent home worldwide.Even religion is affected: The Vatican said Pope Francis may have to change his schedule, tourists have been barred from Bethlehem, and Saudi Arabia emptied Islam’s holiest site in Mecca to sterilize it.China — where the virus emerged late last year — still accounts for the majority of cases and deaths, but infections are now rising faster abroad, with South Korea, Iran and Italy major hotspots.The World Health Organization warned Thursday that a “long list” of countries were not showing “the level of political commitment” needed to “match the level of the threat we all face”. World health officials have warned that countries are not taking the coronavirus crisis seriously enough, as outbreaks surged across Europe and in the United States where medical workers sounded warnings over a “disturbing” lack of hospital preparedness.Global markets tumbled again over concerns about the impact on the economy and as countries took more drastic steps to prevent contagion of a disease that has killed over 3,300 people and infected nearly 100,000 in some 85 nations.Cases soared in Italy, France, Greece, and Iran, while a cruise ship was held offshore in California to test passengers showing symptoms of the disease — echoing a harrowing episode in Japan several weeks ago that saw hundreds infected on a luxury liner. Topics :center_img China imports cases Cases in China have gradually fallen as tens of millions of people remain under strict quarantine to contain the virus.But fresh infections rose for a second consecutive day on Friday, with 143 new cases, and 30 more deaths.China’s death toll now stands at 3,042 with over 80,500 infections.Beijing faces a new concern with the number of cases imported from abroad rising to 36.But cases are increasing faster in other countries.Italy, which has the biggest outbreak in Europe, has ordered schools and universities shut until March 15, and on Thursday reported a sharp rise in deaths, bringing the total to 148.France also reported a steep jump in cases, bringing its total to 423 with seven deaths, as President Emmanuel Macron warned the country was heading towards an “inevitable” epidemic.Italy unveiled a 7.5-billion-euro ($8.4-billion) economic rescue plan while South Korea — the world’s second largest hotspot after China — has proposed an extra budget of $9.9 billion.Stock markets in Asia were sharply down on Friday, with Tokyo losing more than 3.0 percent by the break, following another sell-off on Wall Street as traders fret about the economic fallout from the disease. Countries spend The US Congress passed an emergency $8.3 billion spending bill to combat the coronavirus on Thursday as the number of cases surged in the country’s northwest and deaths reached 12.More than 180 people are infected in the United States.But President Donald Trump has downplayed the risk, saying the WHO’s conclusion of a 3.4 percent mortality rate was “false”.Admiral Brett Giroir, the assistant secretary of health, estimated the death rate at “somewhere between 0.1 percent and one percent” — closer to the seasonal flu — due to a high number of unreported cases.Passengers on a cruise ship stranded off the coast of San Francisco were confined to their cabins Thursday as tests were conducted to determine if any of the nearly 3,500 guests and crew had contracted the new coronavirus.Health officials sounded the alarm after two passengers who had been on board during a previous voyage between San Francisco and Mexico later fell ill and one of them died. The Grand Princess belongs to Princess Cruises, the company that operated the Diamond Princess — the coronavirus-stricken ship held off Japan last month from which more than 700 people tested positive and six died.last_img read more