first_imgWINNIPEG — Children’s advocates from across the country are to release research today on youth suicide.The Canadian Council of Child and Youth Advocates is calling on all levels of government to take action.The council includes members from nearly every province and territory and the research is to be shared at a national conference in Winnipeg.Statistics Canada figures show suicide was the second-leading cause of death among Canadians between the ages of 10 and 35 in 2017.One Manitoba First Nation called a state of emergency last month after four deaths and 22 attempts this summer alone.Ainsley Krone, deputy Manitoba advocate, says information on youth suicide is collected in various ways across the country, so reliable national data can be a challenge.The Canadian Presslast_img

first_imgSeth Rogen and Lauren Miller Rogen’s Hilarity for Charity (HFC), a movement founded as a resource for the millennial generation with a focus on supporting Alzheimer’s care and support, today announced that Amy Schumer, Jim Gaffigan and Colin Jost will bring their comedic talents to the Third Annual HFC NYC Variety Show on Thursday, June 8, 2017 at Webster Hall.“I’m pumped we’ve got this level of talent joining us for the night, and even more pumped for our attendees to pour their money in to the hands of Hilarity for Charity,” said Rogen. Additional performances will be announced in the near future.HFC NYC complements the group’s marquee Los Angeles Variety show, and is hosted by a New York based committee led by Miller Rogen’s brother, Dan Miller. The event is expected to raise more than double last year’s $200,000 in contributions to help propel HFC’s mission.“I’m truly honored this impressive line-up of talented and passionate comedians wants to help bring awareness and support for Hilarity for Charity. We are looking forward to a night full of laughter, music and raising funds for such a worthy cause,” said Miller Rogen.Past HFC events have included performances and appearances by some of Hollywood’s biggest stars including Snoop Dogg, Aziz Ansari, Miley Cyrus, Judd Apatow, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Michael Che, James Franco, Leslie Jones, Courtney Love, Mindy Kaling, The Backstreet Boys and many more. Since inception, HFC has raised over $6.5 million to benefit those affected by Alzheimer’s disease.For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit hilarityforcharity.org.last_img read more

first_img Facebook ‘The only real thing we have is love’: Ellen DeGeneres captures Calgary crowdShe came, she spoke and she conquered the hearts of tens of thousands of Calgarians. On Saturday evening, Ellen DeGeneres swept into the Saddledome and gave her fans everything they’ve come to expect from the consummate entertainer and comedian. They got the laugh out loud moments, the beautiful stories that brought tears to their eyes and of course, a whole lot of dancing.Of course, this wasn’t a crowd that needed any convincing of the fun that can be had when in the presence of the 60-year-old host of The Ellen DeGeneres Show, one of the most popular daytime TV talk shows in history. READ MOREEllen DeGeneres honours Humboldt Broncos during Canadian appearance (VIDEO)Calgary’s Scotiabank Saddledome was absolutely packed on Saturday night, and it wasn’t because of a hockey game or a big-time country music concert, it was for one of TV’s most-loved talk-show hosts, Ellen DeGeneres. Hosted by Calgarian TV personality Dave Kelly, A Conversation With Ellen DeGeneres gave attendees the opportunity to see the Finding Nemo voice actor answer an in-depth Q&A session about life and love during this live one-night-only show on April 21. READ MOREEllen DeGeneres pays tribute to Humboldt Broncos crash victims at Calgary eventEllen DeGeneres began a speaking engagement in Calgary on Saturday night by carrying a hockey stick on stage to pay tribute to the victims of the Humboldt Broncos bus crash.After kissing it in front of a cheering and packed crowd of about 15,000 people at the Scotiabank Saddledome, the popular talk-show host placed it alongside a number of others standing on a rack in the back corner of the stage. READ MOREEllen DeGeneres pays tribute to Humboldt Broncos in CalgaryTalk show host Ellen DeGeneres paid tribute to the victims of the Humboldt Broncos bus collision on Saturday night in Calgary. The “Ellen DeGeneres Show” star entered the stage at the Saddledome carrying in a hockey stick, which she then held up and kissed. “My heart breaks for everyone,” she told the crowd. READ MORE Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Rabat – The Moroccan Alternative Movement for Individual Freedoms (MALI) staged a symbolic protest on Wednesday night, April 24, against abortion laws, sticking sanitary pads covered in fake blood to the walls of the Ministry of Health in Rabat.The protest was filmed by French documentary web-series “Clit Revolution.” It will be broadcast on May 16 on FranceTV as part of Clit Revolution’s “documentary road trip across the world to meet women and heroes who defy social norms and reclaim their sexuality.”Read Also: US Report Lists Violence on Women, Corruption As Concerns in MoroccoThe sanitary pads read outspoken feminist messages like, “My body, my rules,” “My vulva, my uterus, my decision,” and “The right to abort is a fundamental freedom.” “We consider that the repressive legislation that criminalizes abortion is a grave violation of women’s rights,” MALI stated in a press release following the protest.“M.A.L.I. fights for abortion rights for ALL women. This is a matter of equality amongst all women … and one that promotes the idea of choice, without judgment and without limitations. The question of choice, when it comes to sexual and reproductive rights, is not only about abortion, but also about the right to access sexual education and appropriate contraception.”MALI wants the “controlling and sexist” laws to be changed. Abortion is a criminal offence in Morocco. Both carrying out the abortion as a doctor and receiving it as a woman is illegal, except when the abortion is necessary to “preserve the health of the mother” and the woman’s partner has authorized it. In 2016, the Moroccan government agreed in principal to change the law to also legalize abortion in cases of rape, incest, situations where the mother has serious mental health issues, or when the fetus has a serious illness or malformation. However, since then, the Parliament has not taken any steps to change the law. In July last year, Morocco banned the drug “artotec.” Usually used to treat rheumatism and joint problems, the drug can also trigger an abortion.  “Risk-free abortion is a matter of public health, and a matter of social justice,” criticized MALI at the time. read more

NEW YORK — Changes announced in corporate dividends Apr. 1-Apr. 5.INCREASED DIVIDENDSArtesian Resources Cl A .2459 from .2423Bank of South Carolina .16 from .15Bank OZK .23 from .22Investar Holding .0525 from .05Oxford Industries .37 from .34Science Applications Intl .37 from .31TJX Cos .23 from .195UDR .3425 from .32250SPECIAL DIVIDENDSBanco Bradesco Ord Adr .0045g- Canadian fundsOTHER CORPORATE NEWS AND LISTINGS:STOCK SPLITS THIS WEEKArca Biopharma Inc 1 for 18 reverse splitBerkley WR Corp 3 for 2 splitMidatech Pharma ADR 1 for 10 reverse splitRoadrunner Transportation Systems 1 for 25 reverse splitACQUISITIONS AND MERGERSMINIMUM VALUE $350 MILLIONArris International plc – CommScope Holding Co (7.4B)Blue Hills Bancorp – Independent Bank Corp (727M)Immune Design Corp – Merck & Co (300M)Integrated Device Technology – Renesas Electronics Corp (6.7B)NEW STOCK LISTINGSNYSEDow IncRMG Acquisition CorpRMG Acquisition Corp warrantsNASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETSNGM Biopharmaceuticals IncRuhnm Holding Ltd ADSSilk Road Medical IncTradeweb Markets Inc Cl A (IPO)STOCKS REMOVED FROM TRADINGNYSESouthcross Energy PartnersNASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETSAceto CorpIberiabank Corp 6.1pc pfd DNational Commerce CorpPershing Gold CorpCORPORATE NAME CHANGESAxovant Sciences Ltd to Axovant Gene Therapies LtdDSW Inc to Designer Brands IncKCAP Financial Inc to Portman Ridge Finance CorpThe Associated Press read more

Maoist army personnel were observed this morning outside the main cantonment site in Nawalparasi and its satellite sites in the western region of Nepal, UNMIN said in a press release, adding that it had deployed three mobile teams to monitor the situation.“This is a serious violation of commitments made in the agreement of arms and armed personnel reached between the Maoists and their partners in the Interim Government,” UNMIN stated.The mission said it had conveyed its concerns to the political and military leadership of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), which advised that it had ordered the immediate return of personnel to the cantonment sites.Under last year’s agreement ending the civil war, the Maoists agreed that their combatants would be confined at the cantonment sites, where they and their weapons can be registered and verified, in the lead-up to Constituent Assembly elections scheduled for November.UNMIN said in its press release that “while the verification process of Maoist army personnel is proceeding well, implementing the commitments in relation to the management of arms and armed personnel, without exception, is essential to the overall peace process and in particular to preparing a free and fair atmosphere for the Constituent Assembly election.” 14 September 2007The United Nations Mission in Nepal (UNMIN) has voiced concern that large numbers of Maoist soldiers today briefly left one of the cantonment sites where they had agreed to stay as part of last year’s peace accord ending the conflict in the Himalayan country. read more

The Toronto stock market was lower Thursday amid major announcements from the oilpatch, earnings disappointments and uncertainty about the Federal Reserve’s next move.The S&P/TSX composite index was down 39.53 points to 13,415.8.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B) was a major drag, down 37 cents or seven per cent to $4.91, as the transport giant missed on earnings and revenue. It posted adjusted net income of $165 million or nine cents per share, which was one cent below estimates. Third-quarter revenue totalled $4.1 billion, down slightly from $4.2 billion in the same period last fiscal year and also below analyst estimates.The Canadian dollar rose as growth for August came in higher than economists had forecast. The loonie was up 0.46 of a cent to 95.84 cents US after Statistics Canada reported that gross domestic product grew by 0.3 per cent in August against the 0.2 per cent rise that was expected.Suncor Energy Inc. announced Wednesday after the close that the Fort Hills oilsands project will go ahead with cost estimated at $13.5 billion. The cost will be shared between Canada’s largest energy company and partners Total E&P and Teck Resources Ltd. (TSX:TCK.B).Suncor also said it recorded net earnings of $1.69 billion, or $1.13 per common share, for the third quarter, compared with $1.54 billion, or $1.01 per common share a year ago. Suncor stock slipped 17 cents to $37.82 while Teck fell 75 cents to $28.56.Also Wednesday, Enbridge Inc. (TSX:ENB) announced plans to build a $1.6-billion pipeline to bring crude from Fort Hills and other Suncor oilsands projects to its hub in Hardisty, Alta.Enbridge is also moving ahead with plans to build a $1.4-billion pipeline to bring diluent — a lighter petroleum product used to thin-out bitumen so that it can flow through pipelines — from Edmonton to the oilsands region. Enbridge drifted two cents higher to $18.96.U.S. indexes were lower after Wednesday’s announcement from the Fed left traders no wiser about when the central bank might start tapering its US$85 billion monthly bond purchasing scheme.The Dow Jones industrials declined 46.97 points to 15,571.79, the Nasdaq was down 12.71 points to 3,917.91 while the S&P 500 index shed 4.25 points to 1,759.06.The Fed said it would maintain the program for now but hinted that tapering could occur earlier than many investors thought. There had been hopes that the Fed wouldn’t move until at least March, well after Janet Yellen has taken over the reins at the central bank.The gold sector was the biggest sector decliner, down 3.65 per cent while December bullion fell $24.30 to US$1,325 an ounce. Goldcorp (TSX:G) fell 97 cents to $26.66.Barrick Gold Corp. (TSX:ABX) says it will cut its already reduced capital spending budget by a further US$1 billion next year as a result of suspending construction at its troubled Pascua-Lama project which straddles the Argentina-Chile border. At the same time, the miner handed in adjusted earnings of 58 cents per share, down from last year but seven cents better than estimates. Its shares were 33 cents lower to $20.57.Techs were also a drag as business software company Open Text Corp. (TSX:OTC) fell $5.02 to $74.23 even as the company more than doubled its quarterly profits to $30.6 million, or 52 cents per share. Its shares faded 15 cents to $20.75.But chief executive Mark Barrenechea noted that the company faced slower growth as the result of partial U.S. government shutdown earlier this month and a last minute deal to avoid a potential default.The base metals sector was down one per cent as December copper lost two cents to US$3.31 a pound. HudBay Minerals (TSX:HBM) dropped 21 cents to C$8.47.Financials led advancers, up 0.55 per cent with TD Bank (TSX:TD) ahead 81 cents to $96.35.The energy sector was up 0.24 per cent with December crude down 49 cents to US$96.28 following a tumble of almost $1.50 Wednesday in the wake of data showing a much bigger than expected rise in U.S. inventories last week.Imperial Oil Ltd. (TSX:IMO) missed expectations for earnings and revenue. Imperial had $647 million of net income, or 76 cents per share, down from $1.04 billion or $1.22 a year earlier and below the estimate of 98 cents per share.Imperial’s revenue for the quarter was $8.6 billion, up from $8.3 billion a year earlier, but less than the estimate of $9.5 billion and its shares dropped 65 cents to $45.30.In the U.S., Facebook shares were down 99 cents or two per cent to US$48.61 even as the social networking site blew past expectations. Earnings per share ex-items were 25 cents a share, six cents better than forecast while quarterly revenue surged 60 per cent from a year ago to $2.02 billion against estimates of $1.911 billion. read more

The United National Front (UNF) presented a motion to Parliament today to suspend funds to the Prime Minister’s office.The motion was presented by UNF Parliamentarian Ravi Karunanayake. The motion also notes that Parliament has full control over Public Finance as mandated in Article 148 of the Constitution and accordingly Parliament resolves that from 15th November, 2018 the Secretary to the Prime Minister has no authority to approve any expenditure drawn from the funds of the Republic, and any person taking any action in violation of this Resolution will be dealt with according to law.  (Colombo Gazette) UNF MP Navin Dissanayake seconded the motion. The motion notes that the House on 16th November, 2018, accepted the official statement made by the Speaker on 15th November, 2018 that, in terms of paragraph 2 of the No Confidence Motion against the Government adopted on 14th November 2018, the Cabinet of Ministers stood dissolved in terms of Article 48 of the Constitution, and accordingly this House further resolved that, since 26th October, 2018, as contemplated in Article 48 of the Constitution, this House had no confidence in the Government including Mahinda Rajapaksa. read more

Mr. Annan arrived for the meeting with the leader of the Palestinian Authority from Israel on the latest leg of his regional tour to promote the full implementation of resolution 1701 that ended the month-long conflict in Lebanon, which he emphasized should not be allowed to divert attention from the plight of the Palestinians. “The suffering of the Palestinian people must not be forgotten… I have made my feelings known in talks with Israeli officials. Beyond preserving life, we have to sustain life. The closure of Gaza must be lifted. Crossing points must be opened not just to allow goods in, but to also allow Palestinian exports out as well,” he told reporters at a joint press conference with Mr. Abbas in Ramallah. “I also discussed with President Abbas his ongoing efforts with Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh to form a National Unity Government. This is a very important process. If the Palestinians can unite around a common and realistic programme, and if this can help bring the security situation under control, it would be a very positive step indeed.” Mr. Annan said he had also spoken with the President about efforts to release the abducted Israeli soldier who was kidnapped in June. The meeting also focused on ending the rocket attacks and Israeli incursions, as well as Mr. Abbas’ long-standing demands for progress on Palestinian prisoners. “The immediate problems are those of daily life. And I mean ‘life’ quite literally. Over 200 Palestinians have been killed since the end of June. This must stop immediately.” “I fully agreed that an end to the occupation and the creation of a Palestinian state living side by side with Israel is key to resolving the problems of this troubled region.” From Ramallah, Mr. Annan flew to Jordan, where he is scheduled to hold meetings with Foreign Minister Abdul Ilah Khativ and King Abdullah tomorrow. He will then continue his regional diplomatic initiative with stops planned in Syria, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Egypt and Turkey. read more

by News Staff Posted Apr 23, 2012 11:05 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email EU imposes new sanctions on Syria, banning luxury goods, products with military uses LUXEMBOURG – The European Union on Monday banned the sale of luxury goods and products to Syria that can have military as well as civilian uses.The ban on luxury items appears to take direct aim at some of Syrian President Bashar Assad’s most loyal supporters: the business community and prosperous merchant classes that are key to propping up the regime. An influential bloc, the business leaders have long traded political freedoms for economic privileges in Syria.So far, the wealthy classes have stuck to the sidelines, but if the economic squeeze reaches them, it could be a game changer, analysts say.Assad, who inherited power in 2000, spent years shifting the country away from the socialism espoused by his father. In the process, he helped boost a new and vibrant merchant class that transformed Syria’s economic landscape even as the regime’s political trappings remained unchanged.EU foreign affairs chief Catherine Ashton said the EU’s 27 foreign ministers approved the new set of sanctions — the 14th in the past year — “because of deep concern about the situation and continuing violence in spite of the ceasefire.”“We expect the government to withdraw all troops and heavy weapons from towns and cities (and) we want to make sure that the regime gives full access to humanitarian organizations.”The U.N. estimates that more than 9,000 people have been killed since an uprising against the government of Assad began in Syria a year ago.Previous rounds of U.S. and EU sanctions have done little to stop the bloodshed, although there are signs the Syrian economy is suffering. International measures against Assad’s regime have depleted its foreign currency reserves by half, French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said last week.EU experts will work out later precisely which goods will be included in the new embargo. One of the diplomats said so-called “dual-use” goods can include anything from vehicles to fertilizers and other chemicals.The only precedent in international relations for the luxury ban is one imposed by the EU in 2007 on North Korea for its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Officials said this could serve as a model for the same measure against Syria. That ban included foods such as caviar and truffles, high-quality wines and spirits, fashion accessories including bags and shoes, perfumes, crystal and silverware, and purebred horses.The United Nations has sent an advance eight-person observer team to Syria to support a plan by international envoy Kofi Annan to end the country’s 13-month crisis. The U.N. has authorized a mission of 300 observers.“We need to continue to intensify pressure on the Assad regime,” British Foreign Secretary William Hague said. “They are not in complete compliance with the cease-fire provisions of the Annan plan.”___AP writer Elizabeth A. Kennedy in Beirut contributed to this report. read more

first_imgThermo Fisher Scientific has introduced “Thermo Scientific Ultra Performance Packages” for improved light element analysis. To achieve a higher level of performance, the packages combine a portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) analyser with a larger silicon drift detector (SDD), unique, field-portable sample preparation tools, and a helium (He) purge option. Thermo states that this combination of portable technologies is a breakthrough for determining light element concentrations in field-prepared mineral samples.This capability is increasingly important for oil and gas and industrial mineral exploration as light element analyses is used to infer mineralogy, which can help to determine physical properties of rocks, such as permeability, porosity and oil/gas production capability. Today, more than 3,000 Thermo Scientificportable XRF analysers are used across the global mining industry for mineral exploration, from gold and copper porphyry deposits to nickel laterites, rareearth and platinum group elements. Thermo states: “Portable instruments are an integral part of next-generation mining, putting the power and precision of a laboratory instrument in the hands of field personnel to accelerate discovery and contribute to increased profitability.”“Until now, sample presentation limitations have made the geochemical analysis of light elements using field-portable XRF instrumentation unreliable,” said Jon Culbertson, Vertical Market Director of Mining and Exploration for Thermo Scientific Portable Analytical Instruments. “By combining multiple technologies in a single package, we’re giving our customers next-gen mining innovation that can improve exploration and, ultimately, accelerate the entire mining process.”Available Ultra Performance Packages can include:– A Thermo Scientific XL3t Ultra XRF analyser that is purpose-built for mining and exploration analyses, including a larger silicon drift detector for higher resolution and superior light element analyses;– Field-portablesample preparation tools that can create powders out of larger rocks and samples to optimise particle distribution and can deliver pressed pellet samples with the correct presentation and depth for optimal FPXRF analysis;– An He purge system to displace air in the gaps between the sample and the detector that can make it difficult to “see” light elementslast_img read more

first_imgAlerte Météo France Orange : vigilance neige et verglas dans 28 départements, le Calvados et la Manche passent au rougeDepuis ce matin, 5h, il neige abondamment sur la partie supérieure d’une ligne partant du Finistère pour arriver sur les Ardennes, en passant par la région parisienne. La Normandie, la Picardie et le Nord-Pas-de-Calais sont plus durement touchés, à un tel point que deux départements, la Manche et le Calvados, sont passés en alerte rouge, signifiant un phénomène climatique dangereux. Accompagnée de vents soufflant en rafale, la perturbation devrait durer tout au long de la journée pour se calmer en fin d’après-midi et dans la nuit de mardi à mercredi.Météo France a placé 27 départements en vigilance orange depuis ce matin, 5 h. Les départements de la Meuse, de la Meurthe-et-Moselle et de la Moselle accompagnent désormais les autres parties du territoire touchées par une dépression apportant de la neige et du verglas en abondance sur la partie supérieure du territoire situé au-dessus d’une ligne Finistère-Ardennes.Alerte Rouge sur la Manche et le CalvadosA 10h, ce matin, une cellule de crise a été lancée pour les départements de la Manche et du Calvados, placés en alerte rouge par Météo France. Cette couleur indique un phénomène climatique dangereux, amenant les habitants à rester chez eux et à suivre les recommandations.D’après les critères de Météo France, cela signifie “qu’une vigilance absolue s’impose; des phénomènes dangereux d’intensité exceptionnelle sont prévus ; tenez-vous régulièrement au courant de l’évolution de la situation et respectez impérativement les consignes de sécurité émises par les pouvoirs publics.”Delphine Batho se rend actuellement en Basse Normandie pour évaluer les risques liés à cette perturbation.Les départements en orangeL’Alerte Météo court depuis ce matin 6h et durera jusqu’à mercredi à la même heure. Météo France parle d’un phénomène neigeux remarquable pour la saison, tant par sa durée que par sa quantité.Les départements de la Normandie, de la Picardie et du Pas-de-Calais seront les plus fortement perturbés avec la formation de congères et des chutes de neige pouvant atteindre 20 cm. De plus, la perturbation est accompagnée par des rafale de vent provenant du Nord-Est accentuant la sensation de froid. Les départements le plus au sud, eux, pourraient être touchés par des pluies verglaçantes au préalable de l’épisode neigeux.La perturbation perdra en intensité durant la fin d’après midi de ce mardi et l’accalmie devrait intervenir durant la nuit entre mardi et mercredi. Elle devrait amorcer sa chute d’intensité dans les départements situés le plus au nord de la vigilance orange. Cette accalmie touchant les autres départements concernés par la vigilance orange par la suite.Le trafic fortement perturbéCette dépression a déjà fortement perturbé les transports dans la partie supérieure de l’Hexagone, provoquant de nombreux problèmes sur les routes, dans les aéroports et sur les rails. On notera qu’à Lille aucun TGV n’est en circulation, que 600 véhicules sont bloqués près de Calais, notamment sur l’A15, que tous les vols ont été annulés aux aéroports de Lille-Lesquin et de Beauvais, ou qu’aucune autoroute n’est actuellement praticable dans la Somme.Selon le Nouvel observateur, plus d’un milliers de naufragés de la route ont été recensés dans le Calvados.À lire aussi(VIDÉO) Un radar détecte un nuage de coccinelles de 80 kilomètres de largeÀ Paris, les lignes 8 et 13 du métro ainsi que les rames du RER A et B sont fortement perturbés, et un quart des vols à Roissy (300) et à Orly (une centaine) sont annulés. Des tronçons de l’autoroute A1 et de la N118 situés au nord de la capitale sont également bloqués. Dans un communiqué, la SNCF conseille aux voyageurs de ne pas essayer de venir sur Paris aujourd’hui.Face à la situation, prudence et patience seront donc de rigueur pour une journée qui s’avèrera compliquée jusqu’à la fin de l’après midi au moins.Le 12 mars 2013 à 11:35 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

first_imgGrief counselors were on hand at Woodland High School on Monday after a 17-year-old student died in a car crash over the weekend.The girl, Samantha Effingham, was a senior at the school and a Running Start student, said John Shoup, principal.Students and staff have a variety of options at school for private and public grieving, Shoup said. People can write messages to Effingham and her family on a public bulletin board, write chalk messages on the sidewalk in front of the school or visit a “safe room” to talk with counselors, he said.“It’s OK to be hurting and not know all the answers,” he said.Effingham died in a two-car collision Friday afternoon on state Highway 502 west of Battle Ground, according to the Washington State Patrol. She was in a car with Ryan L. Matison, 20, of Battle Ground. Matison was driving south on Northeast 29th Avenue just before 3 p.m. when he failed to stop at a flashing stop light and turned onto Highway 502, a WSP bulletin said. The sedan collided with a pickup driven by Luke W. Merriman, 23, of Battle Ground, that was traveling east on 502 approaching 29th Avenue, WSP said.Both cars went off the road, said WSP spokesman Trooper Will Finn. Effingham died at the scene.Matison and Merriman were both transported to PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center after the crash. Both were released from the hospital, Finn said.Speed was the cause of the collision, Finn said. Possible charges are still under investigation. Drugs and alcohol did not appear to be factors in the crash, the patrol said.last_img read more

first_img It was probably inevitable that “retro” would become a subgenre unto itself in the indie gaming scene: Development costs are expensive, independently-developed games tend to have more in common with their arcade and console ancestors than their megabudget 21st Century AAA contemporaries, plenty of indie devs came up during the 8 and 16-bit “Golden Age” of gaming – it only makes sense that drafting new games as though they’d been released for the Nintendo Entertainment System or Sega Genesis 20 years ago would become a “thing.”Likewise, it’s also not a surprise that this trend would wind up running parallel with the broader pop-cultural “rediscovery” of the 80s (and early-90s) “exploitation” aesthetic. It’s got an ultraviolent direct-to-video action movies, moody synth-scores, and underground neon/grime design aesthetic – the darker side of an era previously celebrated for its plasticine candy-colored optimism (think The Wedding Singer). Video games themselves, after all, are inextricably linked to much of that sensibility – the underground art/music/club scene’s shift from a the glitter-and-haze Disco-era aesthetic to the stark neon-on-black futurism (aka “strip club lighting,” for you Millennials) always felt directly inspired by early arcade graphics.In any case, Easy Trigger Games’ Huntdown is the latest indie title to take aim at merging both concepts, applying the neon-synth schlock aesthetic successfully adopted by the likes of Far Cry: Blood Dragon and Double Dragon Neon into a pixel-art arcade shooter that feels structurally right at home in that same mid-80s nostalgic ephemera. The resulting creation – boiling down to, essentially, Contra in the universe of Final Fight – certainly looks like “home” to anyone who longs for the pool-hall quarter-munchers of yesteryear (or younger fans who never got the chance to appreciate the same firsthand). But how does it play?AdChoices广告Within expectations: Not bad at all. More so than most other entries in the neo-retro stable, your enjoyment of Huntdown is likely to correlate directly to how fond you are of the era in gaming that inspired it – not just regarding visuals and sound. The level layout is intuitive and self-explanatory, enemies and obstacles are dispensed at a rate that feels both fair and adherent to the ways of an era where such things weren’t effectively limitless. This is where too many such games fall apart – forgetting that the “Golden Age” classics that endure generally do so because they were meticulously built “around” their limitations – not in spite of them.Right from the outset, it’s clear that Huntdown isn’t looking to “fix” the 80s arcade run-and-gun genre so much as inhabit it, and apart from the employment of the der-riguer “screen shake” effect for explosions and heavy hits, there’s little on hand that doesn’t stand out as authentically old-school. It’s no small feat, especially when set up for show at a convention space whose entire overriding visual/aural sensibility is grounded largely in gamer-nostalgia.If you’ve played a round of Contra (or Metal Slug, or any of the thousands or so side-scrolling shooters that have come since), you know the score. Run and jump through sidescrolling levels, collecting items for points and differently-armed guns for power-ups, blasting away at enemies in either single or two-player co-op. Ostensibly, the premise is that you’re bounty hunters infiltrating a lawless near-future city (think Escape From New York) to obliterate the membership of colorfully themed/nicknamed street gangs (a la The Warriors) for profit, but that effectively boils down to kills = points – again, fairly self-explanatory.Whether or not this translates to long-term replayability remains to be seen – the games Huntdown so enthusiastically recreates were largely designed to “work” for a few minutes of play in an arcade or a few hours on a console, with both timeframes extended by difficulty rather than by content. But as a ready-made distraction (the game is currently slated for Steam, PS4, XBox One and Nintendo Switch) Huntdown seems to do its job admirably. PAX East 2017: Hand’s On With DRAGON QUEST HEROES IIPAXEast 2017 Hand’s On With ToeJam & Earl Stay on targetlast_img read more

first_imgSurprised by the mushrooming metal rock culture in India, visiting metal ensembles from the Maldives, France and the United Arab Emirates hope to make headway in their countries even as threats of piracy and the availability of free music online loom large. Struggling to find a foothold in the global rock scenario, metal rock bands Nothnegal from Male, the capital of Maldives, Hacride from Poitiers (France) and Point of View from Dubai (UAE) are wowed by the ‘overwhelming response’ to their brand of music in India. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘The response has been very positive in India. I was very surprised that India has such a growing rock scene. I never expected to see so many fans of metal,’ lead vocalist Luis Roux of Hacride said on the sidelines of a metal concert here.‘We know India for its Bollywood, but we had no idea that metal is growing so much,’ Roux added.Despite Europe’s contribution to rock music, metal is still on the fringes in France.‘It’s a marginal genre. It’s popular among young people, but it’s not recognised in the media – it’s not on the TV, it’s not on the radio. It used to be looked as a country that did not have any metal bands but it’s getting recognition now,’ Roux pointed out. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixRoux, who describes the tenor of Hacride’s music as ‘groovy and progressive’, said that metal is facing stiff competition from a huge profusion of new music and artists thanks to the internet that gives a chance to musicians from across the world.‘With the internet, music is accessible to all. That is a good thing but there are so many artists out there on the web..it’s a huge competition,’ rued Roux.Lead guitarist Hilarl of Nothnegal felt similarly, though the cyberworld has been instrumental in popularising the band’s songs.‘We have toured almost 20 countries in Asia and Europe. Our music is more popular in Europe. This is largely due to our compositions which can be found online,’ said Hilarl.He confessed that the Maldives is yet to recognise the metal genre but hoped that just like India, the island nation in the Indian Ocean will also have a healthy rock scene in the future.‘It is still on the fringes…it’s underground. But we were astonished that India has a developed rock scene. We can definitely hope for the better for our nation,’ said Hilarl.However, piracy has dealt a heavy blow to the budding musicians.Chirodeep Lahiri of Kolkata, who plays the drums for Dubai-based ensemble Point of View, felt piracy is the dark side of the internet that otherwise provides a huge boost to newcomers.‘It’s got both sides. Because of piracy and indiscriminate music downloads, album sales drop. In one way it is a boon as music reaches a lot of people,’ said Lahiri. Despite the negatives, Lahiri reckons metal will ‘prosper and only continue to grow’.last_img read more

first_img2D Video Game Character Animation for Beginners $99 ValueDesigning Gamification $49 ValueLearn the “Hand-Painted” Texturing Style for Video Games $49 ValueLearn to Model & Texture 3D Assets for Mobile Games $29 ValueOriginal price: $1,495 | Wccftech Deals: $69 at 95% discount Share Tweet Submit Creating a game doesn’t have to be a tedious and time-consuming process. With the right tools and access to a wide array of essential game design assets, you can easily design the next popular game and be the next big thing. If you are a gaming enthusiast and have always wanted to dip your feet in this lucrative and booming industry, this is your chance. Believing that no one needs to have a formal video game development degree costing thousands of dollars to create an engaging gaming experience, Stone River eLearning brings you everything that you need to develop your own games at one place. This Game Design Bundle will teach you everything from designing 2D and 3D images, mastering Unity 3D to animating characters and much more.Looking at the appeal and popularity of this fantastic gaming bundle, Wccftech Deals is bringing a MASSIVE 95% discount to its readers, bringing you savings of over $1,400! What are you waiting for? Head over to our Deals page and sign up right now!95% Off Mega Game Design BundleThis bundle covers every aspect of game designing, from programming to designing your characters and everything in between. 7 courses, 128+ hours of content and 2 premium Game Asset Collections are part of this awesome deal. For more information, please visit the Wccftech Deals.Following courses and assets are included in this Game Design Bundle:Game Design Assets from GameArt2D $483 ValueProfessional Video Game Art School Course $300 ValueAssets from Simirk Graphics $280 ValueCreate Original Vector Game Art for Free with Inkscape $107 ValueGame Programming with Unity $99 Valuelast_img read more

first_img The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. The Carestream DRX-1s wireless cassette-size DR detector, shown above and right, fits into an existing table or wall stand Bucky and is designed to enable cost-effective conversion from film or CR imaging systems to highly productive DR technology. News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Videos | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medica read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Related Content Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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The explosion in diagnostic imaging studies in emergency departments (EDs) has led to the need for radiologists to interpret examinations 24 hours a day, seven days a week.Imaging in the ED continues to grow as doctors increasingly rely on medical imaging to triage patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans accounted for 14 percent of all ER visits in 2007, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.With a large portion of the U.S. population reaching 65 years and older by 2020, diagnostic imaging is predicted to continue its upward spiral. As the frontline of care relies increasingly on imaging, the speed and accuracy of the technology becomes more critical. This is especially important for patients who present with potentially life-threatening conditions, such as stroke and chest pain.DR Demand Grows The majority of diagnostic imaging tests conducted in the ED are radiographic (X-ray) images. X-rays, whether acquired on a computed radiography (CR) or digital radiography (DR) system, made up 35 percent of all diagnostic imaging in 2006.1 These systems must be portable for patient comfort, flexible enough to capture images at all angles of the anatomy and able to quickly develop images to facilitate fast and accurate diagnosis.New wireless DR systems are in increasing demand, as the untethered detectors are well-suited for producing digital images in confined spaces, emergency departments, sterile environments and the intensive care unit (ICU), as well as for positioning around patients with limited mobility and during remote imaging.Patients undergoing X-ray exams often suffer from painful debilitation where mobility is limited. They may be using a wheelchair or are unable to stand or sit up. Wireless detectors make it easier for technologists to capture images from hard-to-reach angles.The first company to release a wireless DR cassette in the U.S. market was Carestream Health with the DRX-1 system. The standard cassette size is designed to fit existing X-ray rooms without having to replace or modify existing equipment.Many digital radiography manufacturers now offer wireless cassettes because of the flexibility it offers in imaging. Another spin on DR cassettes is to provide a detachable power supply. The FDR D-EVO by Fujifilm Medical Systems USA gives users the option to untether the cord or hook it up to the system to charge the battery.Clinicians at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC), New Hampshire, emergency department are using the recently released Philips’DigitalDiagnost X-ray system with a wireless detector.“You have a digital cassette that is completely untethered and can be placed in virtually any position,” said Jim Roberts, administrative director of radiology at DHMC. “We are currently taking advantage of this capability in the emergency department where we find it provides many of the same benefits as in the typical ICU portable setting. We can use it on all trauma patients. If we need to keep a patient on a stretcher, we can place the wireless detector under the patient. If we [are dealing with] multiple trauma, a rollover in a vehicle or someone who is very unstable, then we have versatility.”The wireless DR detectors directly compete with portable computed radiography (CR) units.“We are absolutely confident we have been able to reduce the patient stay by using this detector, because we don’t have to move the patients. CR cassette usage has dropped to almost none. We know we have shaved minutes off of the patients’ stay,” Roberts added.Recently, IMIX Americas Inc. integrated a wireless DR cassette and software as part of its IMIX DR system.Speed is another advantage of DR systems. Konica Minolta Medical Imaging introduced the Xpress DR, which provides image previews in about five seconds and touts the ability to take exposures every 10 seconds. Carestream’s DRX-1 system delivers preview images in about five seconds, and D-EVO transmits images to the technologist workstation in five seconds and boasts nine-second cycle times.“With the DigitalDiagnost, you can send the image directly to your picture archive and communication system (PACS) or archive. So speed is definitely the advantage. It takes about six seconds to develop an image,” Roberts noted. “The biggest benefit has been patient comfort and speed.”Today, Roberts will carry the detector no more than 25 feet from the X-ray room. But he believes the future of this technology lies in allowing the clinicians to carry the detector anywhere around the hospital.Door-to-Brain Time From the moment the patient is wheeled into the emergency department to the time the patient is diagnosed and treated, the rapid-response protocol for critically ill stroke patients developed by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., includes a CT scan within 10 minutes of arrival at the local emergency room. This serves to determine the type of stroke — ischemic or hemorrhagic — and allow treatment to begin.A thrombolytic medication is injected intravenously to dissolve the clot for patients whose stroke is ischemic and whose symptoms began less than three hours before arrival at the hospital. The thrombolytic medication increases the chances of a full or almost-full recovery by one-third.With strokes, time equals brain cells. So the need to immediately diagnose the type of stroke and extent of the damage is critical. Typically, for stroke workup, one of the first exams the emergency department will do is a noncontrast CT of the head to rule out the hemorrhage. About 75 to 80 percent of the time, there is no hemorrhage. If there is no hemorrhage, the next step is to do a CT perfusion to determine how much of the brain is deprived of oxygen. One of the fastest tools for analyzing stroke is the Aquilion One by Toshiba America Medical Systems. The 320-detector row CT system can capture the entire brain in one rotation.“The problem is, you don’t know where in the brain the hemorrhage is. That is why you want to look at the entire brain,” said Rich Mather, senior manager of clinical programs, Toshiba’s research department.“Conventional technology can only cover about 4 cm of the head, which is about a quarter of the brain in the dynamic imaging,” Mather said. “That only allows you to look at where the most likely places are that a stroke may have occurred, but you run the risk of missing anatomy and missing the location of the stroke.“With the Aquilion One’s 16 cm of coverage, you get the whole brain,” he continues. “This allows you to do whole-brain perfusion and find out where that stroke is. It is a very rapid and accurate method of looking at dynamic perfusion in stroke patients, and it is great for the emergency department setting.”Some of the centers that use the Aquilion One routinely have optimized their workflow, reducing the time it takes to do the whole procedure from the time they press the button on the scanner until the time they are reading the perfusion mounts on the console, to about four minutes.Treating Chest Pain Chest pain is one of the most common symptoms of patients presenting to an emergency department. In the United States, more than 5 million patients a year come to the emergency room with a chief complaint of chest pain.Emergency department use of 256-slice computed tomography angiography (CTA) can help physicians triage patients with indeterminate chest pain without the need for additional diagnostic testing.“Traditional evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department is frequently inconclusive and often requires the admission of patients for further diagnostic testing, which is costly,” said Minh Lu, M.D., nuclear medicine resident, department of radiology and nuclear medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Md. Lu is the author of a study2 performed at the university, in which 11 patients underwent a CT angiography (CTA) exam on a 256-slice CT system. Doctors evaluated their indeterminate chest pain.Seven patients were found to have a negative CTA and a final clinical diagnosis of insignificant chest pain. Two of the patients had insignificant coronary plaque. Two others had moderate coronary disease, but were given presumptive final diagnoses of noncardiac chest pain. In addition, there were two pulmonary findings and one breast mass found incidentally.“Overall, the diagnostic concordance of 256-slice CTA was 100 percent,” Lu said. “Traditional management of chest pain may require observation prior to a radionuclide stress study or stress echocardiogram before discharge, increasing the length of hospital stay and cost. In contrast, 256-slice cardiac CTA can be performed safely and early in the observation period with rapid and accurate results.“The 256-slice cardiac CTA shows substantial promise in expediting and improving emergency department triaging of patients presenting with chest pain,” Lu adds.Physician reliance on diagnostic imaging to diagnose patients in the ED is destined to grow exponentially. As imaging modalities enhance their speed and accuracy, clinical utility will drive their further adoption.Reference:1. National Health Statistics Reports. Number 7. August 6, 2008.2. Minh, L., et al. “Ultra Low Dose MDCT Evaluation of the Axial Skeleton: A Comparison of Dose and Subjective Clinical Efficacy.” American Journal of Roentgenology. 2010; 194:A1-A4. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Walkaround AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:25Loaded: 11.42%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:25 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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PreviousNext Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more center_img Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more The Philips DigitalDiagnost X-ray system, Shown in these photos, uses a wireless detector that can be placed in any position. The versatility allows the detectors to be used with patients in ICU beds, wheelchairs or on a stretcher in the ED. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more The Philips DigitalDiagnost X-ray system, Shown in these photos, uses a wireless detector that can be placed in any position. The versatility allows the detectors to be used with patients in ICU beds, wheelchairs or on a stretcher in the ED. News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Video Player is loading.Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Feature | July 08, 2010 | Cristen Bolan Emergency Imaging Experiences Evolution As the volume of diagnostic imaging in the ED explodes, technology ramps up acquisition speed and quality Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug… read more last_img read more

first_img News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more News | October 26, 2010 SCCT Partners with American College of Cardiology on Appropriate Use Criteria Update Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more October 26, 2010 – The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) has collaborated with the American College of Cardiology Foundation and other societies on the update to the cardiac CT appropriate use criteria. “The intent of these criteria is to guide the rational use of the procedure, namely avoidance of either under – or overutilization, and thereby lead to more optimal healthcare delivery and justifiable healthcare expenditures,” said Allen J. Taylor, M.D., chair of the writing committee and professor of medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. “Performance and optimal use measures represent the new reality in healthcare and cardiovascular imaging, thus while not ‘guidelines’ per se, these criteria provide a pathway towards optimal utilization of imaging technology. I urge every imager and clinician who uses cardiac CT to not only become familiar with these criteria, but take a personal stake in locally implementing these criteria to the best of their ability.”“The 2010 Appropriateness Criteria represent a major advance for the field of cardiac CT. The rapidly evolving science has led to significant increases in appropriate indications for cardiac CT, including calcium scoring and use in bypass patients, among many others,” said Matthew J. Budoff, M.D., FSCCT, professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, director of cardiac CT at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Center at Harbor UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif., and president of the SCCT. “As clinicians and payers adopt these new criteria, we anticipate ever increasing interest in this important part of the clinicians imaging armamentarium. These new criteria establish a new level of acceptance for cardiac CT and should be met most favorably by both clinicians and payers.”This report will be printed in its entirety in the November/December issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. For more information: www.SCCT.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate read more Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more center_img Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Related Content Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Video Player is loading.ITN Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance AthletesPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 11:59Loaded: 1.36%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -11:59 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s.last_img read more

first_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Technology Reports View all 9 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform The DRX Plus 3543 Detector is faster, lighter and more reliable, as compared to the DRX-1 Detectors, and is IPX37 fluid resistant. The DRX Detector can be shared across all DRX products. Watch video now. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Sponsored Videos View all 142 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. 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Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Sponsored Content | Videos | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 24, 2015 See What’s New in Wireless DR Technology CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more