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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

first_imgNewsHub 15 June 2020Family First Comment: “The proposed potency of the drug won’t be enough for those already using it, and gangs will continue to sell to those under 20. “It’d be a disaster for New Zealand if it’s legalised. For a lot of users, 15 percent doesn’t do it to get high, so they’ll be accessing the more potent cannabis from the gangs and [the gangs will] thrive. “I wouldn’t like to see it legalised at all. I had 35 years in the police and I spent a lot of time interviewing offenders that I arrested that had cannabis issues, and a lot of them told me they regretted touching the stuff because it ruined their lives.”” – Dave PizziniA former detective is warning a black market will still exist and gangs will still thrive even if cannabis becomes legal after this year’s election.Dave Pizzini, a member of the ‘Say Nope to Dope’ campaign, believes there will be a surge of negative impacts if cannabis is legalised. Kiwis will get to vote on the issue at September’s general election.Under the proposed legislation, THC – the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis – can be restricted to a maximum of 15 percent by authorities. The legal age for purchasing it will be 20.Advocates hope the Bill will eliminate illegal supply of the drug while raising awareness of the health risks of using it.But Pizzini told The AM Show on Monday the proposed potency of the drug won’t be enough for those already using it, and gangs will continue to sell to those under 20.“It’d be a disaster for New Zealand if it’s legalised. For a lot of users, 15 percent doesn’t do it to get high, so they’ll be accessing the more potent cannabis from the gangs and [the gangs will] thrive.“I wouldn’t like to see it legalised at all. I had 35 years in the police and I spent a lot of time interviewing offenders that I arrested that had cannabis issues, and a lot of them told me they regretted touching the stuff because it ruined their lives.”But Pizzini believes legalisation could put further strain on New Zealand’s health system, while also devastating lower socioeconomic areas.“The cost to our mental health system, which is already overburdened, would be horrendous. It would increase crime because cannabis is a driver of crime.“Our poor neighbourhoods will have a proliferation of pot shops, just like with the liquor shops in the late 1990s,” he told The AM Show, adding he believes legalisation would cause “devastation”.READ MORE: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2020/06/cannabis-referendum-legalisation-would-be-a-disaster-for-new-zealand-ex-detective.htmllast_img read more

first_img Press Association Beleaguered Newcastle head coach John Carver has told his players to forget about what their relegation rivals are doing as they attempt to drag themselves out of trouble. However, Carver insists he and his players simply have to concentrate on what they can affect. He said: “We’re in a position where we can affect what happens. It’s in our hands. We’re not in the bottom three as it stands and there are three games left. “I can’t afford – and neither can the players – to worry about what everybody else is doing. I didn’t even watch Hull’s game against Arsenal the other night because I can’t affect that. “I’m going to put all my energy and effort into affecting what I can try to affect. That is this football team for the next three weeks. “I’m not bothered about what everybody else does. It’s about what we try to do.” In the circumstances, victory over West Brom – Newcastle last collected three points against Aston Villa on February 28 – would represent a major boost, and Carver is keen not to waste time. He said: “The earlier you get the results, the better.” That, however, may prove far from straightforward with the Baggies having eased to the 40-point mark with last weekend’s 1-0 victory over Manchester United at Old Trafford. Indeed, Tony Pulis’ men are unbeaten in three games and have collected seven points along the way and Carver, who will be without suspended duo Mike Williamson and Daryl Janmaat and the injured Siem de Jong, is under no illusions as he prepares for a potentially season-defining encounter. He said: “It will be a tight game – I don’t think there will be many goals in it, judging our record and theirs. We need to find a way to win the game.” center_img The Magpies will run out against West Brom at St James’ Park on Saturday having gone into the weekend sitting just two points clear of the Barclays Premier League drop zone after a run of eight successive defeats. Their form, coupled with growing tide of pessimism surrounding the club after last weekend’s deeply damaging 3-0 reverse at Leicester, has catapulted them into the thick of a survival scrap as they, derby rivals Sunderland and Hull all battle to keep their heads above water along with bottom two Burnley and QPR. last_img read more

first_imgChristchurch: India skipper Virat Kohli feels young Prithvi Shaw, who didn’t have a great outing in the first Test against New Zealand, is a “very destructive” player and all that he needs to do is have a clear frame of mind to come good.In the Test series opener at the Basin Reserve, Shaw was found wanting against Tim Southee and Trent Boult in both the innings, thus drawing criticism over his technique.“I don’t think at this stage, we need to sit down and discuss what’s going wrong because I don’t see anything wrong. It’s the execution of things which was not there,” Kohli said while talking to reporters on Wednesday.“It is just a matter of understanding the pace of the wicket and conditions as soon as possible. Again, when he (Shaw) is in a clear frame of mind, he is very, very destructive. Once he feels that he can do it, I think it will be a different ball game. The mindset can shift very quickly,” he added.Shaw has only played three matches for India till now in which he has scored 267 runs, including a hundred and a half-century.The Indian skipper further said that Shaw, like every other batsman, wants to perform and for that he needs the confidence of the team as well as time, which the team management is willing to provide. “We need to give him that time to get used to the conditions a little bit and once he starts scoring, he will feel more confident about it,” the captain said.“He (Shaw) will figure out. He will find ways to score runs because he is a natural stroke-player and he scores runs. It is not that he gets small runs (when he gets them). He gets big runs and knows how to get runs. (IANS)Also Read: Virat Kohli a class player, doesn’t have many weaknesses: Tim SoutheeAlso Watch: ATDC Chairman Jayanta Malla Baruah attends BJP’s organizational meeting ahead BTAD electionslast_img read more

first_imgUSAIN Bolt leads Jamaican qualifiers into the 100-metres semi-final at the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Bolt, running in Heat 7, found himself mid pack after the first 30 metres of a poor drive phase, and had to work to come through it.Bolt’s 10.07, not more than a quick jog for the world record holder and defending Olympic champion, was the fourth fastest time coming out of the first round, with the United States’ Justin Gatlin (10.01), Côte d’Ivoire’s Ben Youssef Meïté (10.03), and Canada’s Andre De Grasse (10.04), finishing ahead of him.Also through from Jamaica were Yohan Blake, who won his heat in 10.11, and Nickel Ashmeade, who was second in his, clocking 10.13 seconds.There were some stutters for the Caribbean, with Trinidad and Tobago’s Richard Thompson, crashing out, along with teammates Rondel Sorrillo and Keston Bledman.Barbados Ramon Gittens also failed to qualify, running 10.25 to crash out, while The Bahamas’ Shavez Hart’s 10.28 was also not good enough.St Kitts and Nevis’ Antoine Adams (10.39), St Lucia’s Jahvid Best (10.39), and The Bahamas’ Jamial Rolle (10.64), will also take no further part in the 100-metre event.For St Kitts, there was some good news, as veteran sprinter Kim Collins, at 40 years old, is through to the semi-finals of the 100 metres, having finished fourth in his heat in 10.18.Antigua and Barbuda have also been given a boost with both Ryan Bailey and Cejhae Green making it to semis.Jamaicans running for other countries have also made their mark, with Andrew Fisher, turning out for Bahrain, qualifying qith 10.12, and his teammate, also from the Caribbean island, Kemarley Brown, qualifying with 10.13.Jak Ali Harvey, who moved from Jamaica to Turkey, is also through with his 10.14 being more than good enough.last_img read more

first_imgWHEN it comes to sports, Abosaide Cadogan has proved that she is one versatile athlete, who has transitioned through a number of sports and has now found her current niche as a bright up-and-coming junior squash player. She is also showing a lot of promise in the hockey arena as a member of the GCC Spartan Juniors team.On her way to finally settling as a squash player, the St Stanislaus College student was also once a promising national badminton champion. She has also dabbled a little in lawn tennis, table tennis and even athletics.“She is a quick learner,” observed national hockey coach, Philip Fernandes, who works with the Guyana Cricket Club (GCC) hockey teams.“She has great physical ability and natural talent and so she was able to learn the game in no time.”What drives Cadogan is her willingness to learn, and she benefits from mistakes and makes improvements.“Once I was taught something I know that I would improve on it, so I know it was going to work,” was how she approached her start in squash, when she was still developing into a winner.Her improvements last year, were enough to land her on the national junior team at the Junior Caribbean Squash Championships where she finished third place in the Girls’ Under-13 category.At this year’s Championships she made it to the final of the Girls’ Under-15 category, stopped in her quest for a title only by Barbados’ Chelsie Samuels.Starting out in athletics since she was in primary school, at St Gabriel’s Primary, Cadogan even once participated in the revered National Schools’ Championships (Nationals) where she represented the East Georgetown District. Then she began her run in the racquet sports.She seems to be naturally talented wherever she lands, and does a fine job of juggling it all, even as a student athlete.“It’s pretty easy to me,” she said earnestly “It just isn’t a problem for me I guess.”As a badminton player she represented Guyana at the 2013 Caribbean Regional Badminton Confederation (CAREBACO) in 2013 where she won gold in the Girls’ Under-11 singles, while representing again in 2014 in Jamaica. She won gold in the Girls’ Under-13 singles and bronze in the doubles competition.But soon that all phased out, and Cadogan found a new love in squash. After picking up squash in 2015, Cadogan got involved in hockey last year – her first time juggling two sports at the same time. But somehow she seems to be pulling it off flawlessly.When asked about her love for squash and hockey, her eyes light up. If it came down to making a choice, she doesn’t know which sport she would choose over which.“With hockey I like the idea of having a team where you have members and we bond and stuff. With squash I just love the game,” she shares.Though she is still yet to get her chance to represent Guyana in hockey, she has already been making strides locally. Already she has become a top goalscorer on the team. As one of many squash players who also play hockey, Cadogan’s new sport fits right in with her schedule.last_img read more

first_imgOrange attack Kailah Kempney provided a spark inside the draw circle and continued to climb through the Syracuse record book in the process.The junior attack recorded seven draw controls to lead all players in No. 2 Syracuse’s (3-0, 0-0 Atlantic Coast) 18-6 victory over Canisius (0-1) in Carrier Dome Sunday. She has now eaten up 25 draws through the first three games of the 2014 season.With her third control of the game, she also moved into second place in program history with 171. Kempney is only 10 behind all-time leader Christina Dove.“Just our communication,” Kempney said of the Orange’s key to success throughout the game. “We’re all on the same page when we go out to take the draws.”In total, SU controlled 17 draws to the Golden Griffins’ nine.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter Kelly Cross opened the scoring only five minutes into the game, Kempney began to find a rhythm at midfield. She won the draw, and Kayla Treanor eventually cashed it in for her first goal of the game.On the ensuing draw, Kempney lobbed the ball to midfielder Katie Webster. Attack Alyssa Murray soon drew a free-position shot. She failed to convert, but Amy Cross backed her up for another goal.SU then had its roughest stretch of the game inside the circle, losing three of four draws. Head coach Gary Gait said those spurts are just a part of shaking off the rust during the opening weeks of play.“These games are important, and they mean a lot for improving when we get to the middle of our season,” he said. “You’re going to figure out more as you go, but the good thing is we definitely have some things we can tweak and work on.”The Orange was still able to build an 8-2 advantage through 26 minutes of play. Then Kempney helped open the floodgates.She won three draws outright and tipped a fourth out to Lisa Rogers during the final four minutes of the period. Each one led to a Syracuse goal, including two tallies from freshman Taylor Poplawski.Murray said that SU’s success on draws allowed Poplawski to get free on a couple fast breaks en route to her breakout four-goal outing.“Taylor does a great job of just getting the self-draws and just shooting it straight up,” Murray said. “It really caught the defense on their heels.”Kempney was a direct factor on Poplawski’s third tally, as she fed Murray with a beautiful outlet pass downfield. The senior then found Poplawski, who completed her hat trick.Poplawski added that every victory on the draws built momentum for the offense. She said Kempney’s dominance was key to her blistering run at the end of the first frame.“Getting the draw, it really gives you the extra push,” Poplawski said.Kempney was happy with her own performance, but she credited team chemistry for the Orange’s offensive outburst.“Everyone knows what’s going on, and we really work together,” she said.Kempney also contributed outside of the midfield circle. She tallied a pair of assists, including one on Poplawski’s fourth goal during the closing seconds of the first half.The Orange only added five goals in the second frame, but its success on draws continued. Brenna Rainone added a pair, and Webster came away with her second.Their success, combined with Kempney’s strong outing, left Gait optimistic as the meat of the season begins.“We can improve on some of the situations we had there, and timing and things like that.” Gait said. “ But our draw controls were solid today.” Comments Published on February 16, 2014 at 8:35 pm Contact Tyler: tfpiccot@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ UPDATED: Jan. 30, 2018 at 12:14 a.m.Nearly three weeks ago, Sofya Golubovskaya was in Moscow, Russia, preparing to leave the only place she ever called home. Her future involved playing tennis for Syracuse, a team that had recruited her since the summer of 2017.It was a “spontaneous decision,” Golubovskaya said.Golubovskaya arrived in Syracuse on Jan. 10 and was playing her first collegiate match 11 days later. Since joining the team, Golubovskaya has racked up three convincing wins, including two 6-0 doubles victories, to help contribute to SU’s 3-0 record to start the season. While her talent was on display in matches against Niagara and Colgate, her health will be a major factor in deciding her role for this team. She’s battled an unspecified leg injury early this season.SU head coach Younes Limam first met Golubovskaya at an International Tennis Federation tournament in Finland last summer. After watching her play three singles matches, Limam wanted Golubovskaya on his team.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It was a no brainer to recruit her,” Limam said, “We knew she would have a big impact on this team from the start.”Limam met with Golubovskaya and her family after the tournament. Before she met Limam, Golubovskaya had never considered coming to America for the long-term. The only time she was ever in the United States was a trip to Miami when she was 11 years old.“My mom told me ‘Maybe you want to change something in your life,’” Golubovskaya said, “and I was like ‘yeah, let’s do it.’”Although she had made up her mind to attend SU after meeting Limam, Golubovskaya had to wait to be cleared by the NCAA. She needed to take the SAT, be approved by the NCAA clearinghouse and be admitted into Syracuse.She took a gap semester after her spring 2017 high school graduation in which she spent the vast majority of her time preparing to play American tennis. In late December, Golubovskaya was cleared by the NCAA and Limam told his players that she would officially join the team for the spring semester.At first, Golubovskaya was hesitant to bond with the team, junior Gabriela Knutson said.Golubovskaya is the only freshman on a team stacked with a sophomore, four juniors, a senior and a graduate student. Activities like cheering for teammates were new for her, Knutson said, because she was not accustomed to doing that in Russia.“We didn’t act like she was some new person when she arrived,” Knutson said, “she became one of us right away.”In her first singles match of the season, Golubovskaya handled Niagara’s Andreea Peteau with her backhand in a smooth two-set victory. That win gives her confidence to keep being aggressive and competing in the future, she said after that singles win.After cruising to a 6-0 doubles win alongside Libi Mesh on Friday against Colgate, Golubovskaya said she could “barely run or walk.” She received treatment directly after the match, but said it didn’t help her right away. Though she did not compete on Sunday against Columbia, Limam is hopeful Golubovskaya can begin practicing by Tuesday.“There are going to be good and bad days,” Liman said. “She just has to communicate with all of us how she is feeling.”CORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Masha Tritou was misidentified in a photo caption. The Daily Orange regrets this error. Comments Published on January 29, 2018 at 11:09 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelmanlast_img read more