first_imgAllen against Ashton during the 2011 Premiership semi-final2006: Carter evades Allen to score a try during the Autumn InternationalsHe may be mature, he may be sensible, he may be known as the wise old head of the Leicester midfield, but Anthony Allen is keen to point out that he’s only 24. This, it seems, is something that the outside world, and even some of his team-mates, can struggle to come to terms with.“I suppose I’ve been around for a while now,” he says, with a rueful grin. “But it’s still a bit strange. I’ve been here at Leicester two years now and some of the lads still say, ‘Are you really only 24?’ It’s weird.”The reason that Allen has to endure these misconceptions, the reason that he has “been around for a while”, is the two International appearances that thrust him prematurely to prominence as long ago as 2006. A couple of months after he had turned 20 and little more than a year since making his senior debut for Gloucester, Allen was chosen by Andy Robinson, then England coach, to play at centre against New Zealand and Argentina. He was then discarded and is still waiting for a third cap, but his career has been revived by his move to the Tigers. One of their most consistent performers this season, he won the Players’ Player of the Year award and has put himself firmly in the frame for a place in Martin Johnson’s World Cup squad. At 24, Allen is a little young to be seen as a has-been.After a season of otherwise fleet-footed progress, England have remained stuck in the slow lane as far as their centres are concerned. More charitably, they have kept faith with the balance of a side that favours heavy goods vehicles such as Shontayne Hape and Mike Tindall in midfield, rather than sleeker, more creative models. It is this lack of creativity that troubles many supporters, concerned that England may lack the skill in midfield to bring the firepower of Chris Ashton, Ben Foden and Mark Cueto into play.Allen is not a flashy player – the paeans usually include worthy adjectives such as reliable, consistent and hard-working – but he has quicker feet than England’s incumbent centres and, crucially, much better distribution skills. Matt O’Connor, Leicester’s Australian head coach, has become a fervent fan, saying: “I’d pick him for England at 12 because of his ability to use his feet, to communicate and to distribute. Defensively he’s outstanding too. There’s no doubt he’ll get another crack at Test level. I’d like to see him in that role with four or five Tests under his belt so that he can show his wares.”But does Allen possess enough physical presence to persuade Johnson that he wouldn’t be leaving England underpowered in midfield against, say, Sonny Bill Williams or Jamie Roberts? The talk is of centres being in the 100kg club nowadays and, at 91kg (14st 5lb), Allen is around 10kg lighter than Hape and Tindall. “You’re always trying to get stronger, but I’m happy with how I am,” says Allen. “I’ve developed a lot strength-wise in the last couple of years and I feel I can hold my own with anyone now.”Almost five years on from his Test debut, Allen readily concedes that he wasn’t able to hold his own as a callow 20-year-old.He was thrown into an England team that had lost its previous five matches, to play against an All Black side showing its habitual menace the year before a World Cup. It was not a gentle introduction to international rugby. He started well, making a break that led to England’s first try, but then delayed a pass that gave Joe Rokocoko a 55-metre interception try. Later, he was handed off dismissively (right) as Dan Carter scored in the All Blacks’ 41-20 victory. Six days later, England suffered a humiliating 25-18 defeat to Argentina.“It’s a shame that it happened when it did,” says Allen. “I don’t think I was ready. I suppose you don’t really know that until you’re put into that environment, but it was definitely too early. If I was chucked in now, I’d be way more prepared.” Allen was not the only centre whose longer-term potential was jeopardised by premature selection under Robinson. The year before, Mathew Tait had been chosen to face Wales the day before his 19th birthday, something he took a while to recover from. Next season, the two players’ roads to redemption will converge as Tait joins Leicester from Sale. “Mat’s done well since that difficult start,” says Allen. “He’s bounced back from the disappointments and won 30-odd caps. That’s something for me to aim at. He’ll be an asset to the club at Leicester.”It seems unlikely that Allen will remain a two-cap wonder for much longer. For the World Cup warm-up matches against Wales and Ireland in August, Johnson will surely shuffle his midfield options to see what a more creative player can add to England’s game. Those adjectives used to describe Allen – reliable, consistent, hard-working – are qualities prized by the England manager.If Allen doesn’t make it this year, he will still be around for the World Cup on home soil in 2015, when he should be somewhere near his prime. Even in 2019, Allen will only be the same age as Tindall is now. He is only 24, remember.Check out his try versus Bath that was voted the 2011 Try of the Season at the Leicester Tigers Supporters End of Season Awards.This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitlast_img read more

first_imgWarren Gatland singled out Richard Hibbard for a bit of criticism afterwards. A return of four lost lineouts did prove costly and England could play for territory knowing they could put pressure on Wales’ hooker – as Mike Brown did here deep into the game:Again, Attwood was hurled up to intercept:The Bath lock actually dotted down from the ensuing attack, and even though the ‘try’ was disallowed, Wales could not get out of their half from this point.Winning the restart warSo much of the hosts’ early verve was gleaned from the opening kick-off, expertly weighted by Dan Biggar and retrieved by Taulupe Faletau:After that though, England took hold of the aerial exchanges. Ford allowed May and Watson enough time to harry Welsh catchers, while England generally collected and cleared calmly.Two opposing ‘exit plays’ demonstrate this point. First, Webb gets very little ground after Wales pull in the first kick of the second half:Again, Gatland highlighted this mistake as something that invited undue pressure.Compare that  to how Watson gathers here, offloading out of North’s challenge to Ford, who finds Youngs in turn. The scrum half then clears:This was not confined merely to restarts, either. Watch how George Kruis gets up to claim this 22 drop-out. England launch a marching maul to underline their organisation:A remarkable turnaround came full circle in the dying seconds, as Joseph and Twelvetrees combine to snatch this short Biggar restart:Superior power and choking tacticsWe save the most poignant point for last. When ‘Warrenball’ fails to breach the gain-line, there are serious problems. In the second period, England’s pack were so strong that Wales did not get close to exerting momentum. These two phases, again as the hosts are in good field position, offer a good illustration. First, the Vunipola brothers make nuisances of themselves:Wrapping up North, they sap any dynamism from the attack:Though North fights to ground, Wales are already losing metres. Then another Saracen, the outstanding Kruis, nicks the ball too:With Wales at a stand-still, Jake Ball faces an onslaught from Tom Youngs. England’s replacement hooker goes low, allowing Kruis to latch on and form the maul:Mirroring the tactics made infamous by Munster and Ireland in recent years, England continued in this vein. This time, Billy Vunipola, Attwood and Haskell join forces:This moment came when Wales, ironically down to 14 men, were playing their best rugby of the second period. But these England forwards, first showing excellent line-speed, work so well together. Initially hit by Attwood and Vunipola, Jonathan Davies has no chance once Haskell arrives:England should really have scored from the resultant turnover.In attack, Lancaster’s men married the same grit to a bit of guile, which defined the difference between the teams. Transferring the point of contact with short passes close to the defensive line, England both outsmarted and overpowered their rivals.Watch how Haskell makes headway from similarly static ball:Expecting a tip on, Lydiate rushes up and Faletau can only make a weak arm-tackle. Tom Youngs and Robshaw then storm through in support, clearing jackal-threat Warburton:Fittingly, the visitors were back on defence for the final play, and clinched the match in a very satisfying manner, Twelvetrees, Nick Easter and that man Attwood clasping on: LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight “If you look at the first ten minutes as we went 10-0 down, a lesser side would probably have crumbled. The crowd got pretty crazy at that point, but we stuck to our guns” – Chris RobshawScar tissue can be pretty rigid. England have not hidden from the humiliation they experienced at the Millennium Stadium in 2013 when their Grand Slam shot vaporised dramatically in a 30-3 thrashing, preferring to portray it as a painful learning experience.When Wales scrum half Rhys Webb scampered over on Friday evening, some of those dark memories probably came creeping back. However, Stuart Lancaster’s charges stood fast, stuck to script and set themselves up for a monumental year. Here’s how they did it.Ben Youngs’ tempoGiven the chatter about fitness levels in the build-up, this will have stung Wales. Frankly, they could not live with the energy of England’s phase-play and the pace dictated by conductor-in-chief Ben Youngs.The Leicester Tigers scrum-half ran them ragged at times. One attack on the half-hour, which ended in three points for George Ford, illustrates this perfectly. We join the movement as England have moved the ball left and come back into midfield, Billy Vunipola makes some headway amid heavy traffic:With Gethin Jenkins, Taulupe Faletau, Sam Warburton and Jake Ball required to fell the big No 8, Wales are stretched. Youngs looks up to see a sparse defensive set-up. Samson Lee must come across to fill the guard position on the openside, but Alun Wyn Jones has to stay aware – especially as Youngs feigns to attack the fringes:The upshot is that the entire Welsh jams in towards the ruck, which allows England to punch ahead through Robshaw and Ford:Though Jones, Rhys Webb and Dan Lydiate scramble well, more quick ball creates disarray. Look how Dan Biggar calls defenders over to nullify an overlap:Youngs crabs across again to attract the fringe tacklers and, as Jonny May looks to take a gap off his shoulder, Jamie Roberts steps in too early to hit the wing without the ball:Referee Jerome Garces spots the infringement immediately and England take three points to make it 13-8.After the break, Youngs continues to probe and drive England’s dynamism. This time he carries himself:The key here is a quick scan to gauge personnel. Youngs has always backed his pace and evasion against tight forwards, and he has a perfect mismatch to exploit:Lee does make the tackle, but a half-break gets England onto the front foot. A full 20 patient phases later, Jonathan Joseph scorched in to score.Taking opportunitiesOver the past 12 months, England have aspired towards a clinical edge like that of New Zealand. The All Blacks always seem to execute when it matters, turning half-chances into tries.On Friday, England evolved in that regard. Anthony Watson‘s predatory effort set them on the way:This was all about cohesion off the cuff, beginning with an excellent cut-out pass from Luther Burrell. In fact, there is a very Northampton Saints look about the entire situation.Dylan Hartley busts a gut to hit a decoy line, holding George North just long enough to convince Leigh Halfpenny he must join the line:At this point, Brown’s timing on a perfectly-weighted grubber is exquisite, poked through as Halfpenny commits:Like Watson’s effort, Joseph’s try involved many moving parts, this time in approach-play, which encompassed 20 phases. However, a spark of individualism sealed it:First Biggar – an extremely competent one-on-one defender– is beaten, rendered flat-footed by a  trademark stutter-step and outside break:Then Joseph wriggles away from covering duo Webb and North to go over:Timely interventions at set-pieceAll week, while fans and journalists debated who would make an Anglo-Welsh composite XV, Graham Rowntree impressed the pivotal importance of set-piece.He was vindicated, and although England did not have it all their own way, their scrum and lineout held firm at critical points. With Wales 10-0 ahead on 11 minutes, Dan Cole caused Gethin Jenkins to hinge:Ford went to touch and England built an attack ending in Watson’s try. Halfpenny kicked another penalty though, and not long afterwards Wales had dangerous field position with the score at 13-5. Enter Dave Attwood: Completing a superb second-half comeback across the Severn Bridge, England exorcised some demons in Cardiff on Friday night. Here are five areas in which they took they game away from Wales. – / 1Credits: Rugby WorldmoreShowing image 1 of 1 In recent months England suffered a couple of losses to New Zealand by a single score, when perhaps it has not felt they were that close to the world champions. On Friday, the reverse was true. Wales did not deserve to be within six.“A brilliant start,” as Robshaw deduced afterwards. “But it’s only a start.”last_img read more

first_imgWinging in: Ngwenya scored for the USA but they let Japan in two minutes later. (Photo: Getty Images)WHAT’S NOTUSA’s concentration – Both times the USA scored in the first half they conceded points to Japan immediately afterwards. Their fourth minute penalty was soon cancelled out by a sixth minute try for Japan and after Ngwenya scored his try with 25 minutes gone, they let Fujita through less than a minute after the re-start.End of the party – So that’s it, the pool stages of RWC 2015 are over, and only the eight quarter-finalists remain. The party which has raged from Newcastle to Exeter and all points in between will now be replaced by the more serious business of the knockout stages. It’s been a blast. TAGS: JapanUSA All you need to know about the 40th and last pool stage match of this Rugby World Cup. Winning smile: Japan replacement Amanaki Mafi is delighted with his try. (Photo: Getty Images) 67 – Japan enjoyed a slight advantage in the possession and territory stakes over the 80 minutes, but the USA had 67% of territory in the last ten minutes as they chased that elusive win.15 – The number of tackles made by Japan lock Luke Thompson, which was the most in the match.711- The total number of Test match points Japan full-back Ayumu Goromaru now has to his name, after kicking 13 at Kingsholm and passing the 700 mark.11- This was Chris Wyles’ 11th World Cup appearance, equalling the USA record set by Mike MacDonald. USA: C Wyles (capt); T Ngwenya, S Kelly, T Palamo, Z Test; A MacGinty, M Petri; E Fry, Z Fenoglio (P Thiel 63 min), T Lamositele, H Smith (C Dolan 30 min), G Peterson (J Quill 76 min), A McFarland (D Barrett 63 min), A Durutalo, S Manoa.Tries (2): Takudzwa Ngwenya, Chris Wyles. Con: Alan MacGinty. Pens: MacGinty 2.Yellow card: Eric Fry 60 minutes. Boot boy: Ayumu Goromaru kicked 13 points for Japan. (Photo: Getty Images)STATISTICScenter_img Japan finished their Pool B campaign with three wins out of four thanks to this deserved victory over the USA, but the 12 points the Brave Blossoms gathered in the pool leaves them two points short of a World Cup quarter-final spot.The USA made Japan work very hard for this happy ending. The Eagles took the lead with an early penalty but Japan hit back quickly with a try from Kotaro Matsushima. Takudzwa Ngwenya put the USA back in front after 24 minutes with a try, but again Japan countered with a score of their own from Yoshikazu Fujita, converted – like the first – by Ayumu Goromaru, who kicked a penalty to give Japan a 17-8 half-time lead.Try time: Kotaro Matsushima slides in for Japan’s first try v USA. (Photo: Getty Images)Goromaru and Alan MacGinty traded penalties before the impressive Amanaki Mafi took Japan out of sight with a try, so even when Chris Wyles sprinted over for a score which MacGinty converted, USA were still seven points down and a final Goromaru penalty sealed the win.USA leave Rugby World Cup 2015 without a win, while Japan will want the next four years to rush by, before they host the 2019 showpiece. Japan: A Goromaru; Y Fujita, H Tatekawa, C Wing, K Matsushima (K Hesketh 48-56 min); K Ono (K Hesketh 72 min), F Tanaka (A Hiwasa 61 min); K Inagaki (M Mikami 58 min), S Horie (T Kizu 76 min), H Yamashita (K Hatakeyama 40 min), L Thompson, J Ives (S Makabe 67 min), M Leitch (capt), M Broadhurst (H Tui 72 min), R Holani (A Mafi 40 min).Tries (3): Kotaro Matsushima, Yoshikazu Fujita, Amanakai Mafi. Cons: Ayumu Goromaru 2. Pens: Goromaru 3.Referee: Glen Jackson (South Africa)Man of the Match: Ayumu Goromaru (Japan) WHAT’S HOTJapan’s half-backs – Fumiaki Tanaka and Kosei Ono work together as a pair so well. Sometimes so close to each other they are practically joined at the hip, they always keep opponents on their toes.Blossoms’ bravery – Japan came into this match knowing their quarter-final dream was over as Scotland were six points ahead of them in the Pool B table, but they still fought proudly to end the tournament on a high, coming back from behind twice and repelling several strong offensives from the USA.Andrew Durutalo – The USA openside won the most turnovers in the match, five, was joint top of the gain-line breakers with himself and Michael Leitch both crossing the line ten times, and he made 46 metres in attack.Glorious Gloucester – There was nothing but pride riding on this match, and it finished just shy of 10pm on a school night, but local rugby fans of all ages still packed Kingsholm’s stands and terraces to ensure the USA and Japan ended their tournament with a proper rugby send-off. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Attendance: 14,517For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

first_img190 – The number of combined metres Argentina’s wings made with ball in hand.564 – The number of metres Ireland kicked for.7 – The number of clean breaks Argentina made.IRELAND: R Kearney; T Bowe (L Fitzgerald 13), K Earls, R Henshaw, D Kearney; I Madigan, C Murray (E Reddan 70); C Healy (J McGrath 51), R Best (R Strauss 66), M Ross (N White 51), I Henderson (D Ryan 71), D Toner, J Murphy (R Ruddock 70), C Henry, J Heaslip (capt).Tries (2): Fitzgerald, Murphy. Cons: Madigan 2. Pens: Madigan 2.ARGENTINA: J Tuculet; S Cordero, M Moroni (J De la Fuente 68), JM Hernandez, J Imhoff; N Sanchez, M Landajo (T Cubelli 53); M Ayerza (L Noguera 67), A Creevy (capt) (Js Montoya 54), R Herrera, G Petti (M Alemanno 60), T Lavanini, P Matera, JM Fernandez Lobbe, L Senatore (P Orlandi 23, F Isa 51))Tries (4): Moroni, Imhoff 2, Tuculet. Cons: sanchez 4. Pens: Sanchez 5.Yellow card: R Harrera (17)REFEREE: Jerome Garces (France) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Unbridled joy: Man of the Match Nicolas Sanchez jumps for joy (Image courtesy of Inpho) TAGS: Highlight center_img This quarter-final victory felt like the culmination of an eight-year project for Argentina. Finally we can stop talking about 2007 because the nation has totally re-invented its style. Gone is the up-and-unders and slow, painful forwards’ slog. After four rewarding years of Rugby Championship action, this is a far slicker, attack-minded side, who play with pace and guile. And more than that, they deserve great praise.As for Ireland, their horrible record of never winning a World Cup knockout match endures. They mounted a mini comeback in this one, coming within three points of the Pumas in the second half, but they just could not handle Argentina’s sly offloading and superb support play.Moved to tears: Replacement scrum-half Tomas Cubelli lets it all out during the anthemsWHAT’S HOTPumped up Pumas – They were weeping during the anthems, they started at a raging pace and they scored two scintillating tries in ten minutes. The first was a kick return with Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe collecting a skip-pass and feeding Matias Moroni who evaded both Kearney brothers to score. The second was one wing, Juan Imhoff, collecting the kick through from the other wing, Santiago Cordero.Before Ireland knew what was going on they were 17-0 down in as many minutes. As Joe Schmidt said after the game, it was a mountain to climb. A lot of talk after the match was about the gap between northern and southern hemisphere rugby, but in this one-off contest it was the early points gap that proved crucial.Key turnovers – Ireland did mount the briefest of comebacks over the end of the first half and the start of the second, and it was largely based on the smart use of ball when their wily forwards turned over Argentine attackers. However, when Argentina got back into gear, the turnovers became less crucial.Bright young forwards – In Tomas Lavanini, Argentina have a star. The 22-year-old has the total package, in set-piece, carrying and defending. And although Iain Henderson may not have shone in this one, he has such frightening potential. Meanwhile, Jordi Murphy looked like nothing at this level phases him.The form ten in the tournament? – Another game, another Man of the Match award for Nicolas Sanchez. He’s in fine fettle and playing in a World Cup semi. Anything could happen from here on in…Lunging for the line: Jordi Murphy scores Ireland’s second tryWHAT’S NOTIreland’s scrum – every time a ball dropped, a few Irish hearts must have as well. Throughout the first half Marcos Ayerza was gleefully grinding into Mike Ross and with such momentum, Chris Henry always had to back-pedal to make his next tackle. At the start of the second, Ireland put in one big scrum… but then subbed off both of their props.The offside line from rucks – For all of Argentina’s get-up-and-go, they are no firm respecters of the offside-line. Just take a few steps back, lads, and you’ll be able to make your tackles. And while we’re at it, please stop flying over rucks and crashing off your feet.Grin and bear it: Marcos Ayerza doesn’t take kindly to being penalisedSTATISTICS MAN OF THE MATCH: Nicolas SanchezATTENDANCE: 72, 316last_img read more

first_img TAGS: Highlight I last saw Jonah Lomu in London this September at a sponsors event for the Rugby World Cup. He was bedecked in a sharp blue suit, dapper brown brogues, yet what stood out was his easy smile, humility and approachability. He took time to speak to anyone around him – even us pesky journalists.Sadly, it was clear that the years of kidney dialysis had taken their toll. Physically, he seemed to have shrunk, with stooped shoulders and an uneasy gait.What was most interesting, however, was the reactions of other greats of the game. Will Carling – the man who famously called him a freak after the unforgettable 1995 World Cup semi-final – World Cup winners John Smit and Matt Dawson and Welsh dump truck Scott Quinnell all looked up to him. It was clear, they were no different to the rest of us mere mortals. Jonah was, and still is, the man. The first global superstar of rugby union.Poetry in motion: Jonah Lomu outsprints the French defence at the 1999 World CupOf Tongan descent, as a kid, he brought up in the tough Mangere district of Auckland, on the South Island where gangs and violence were commonplace. Thankfully, Jonah took a different path. Prodigiously gifted, he broke virtually all athletic records at Wesley College, and was destined for greatness from a young age.At 19, he played in the Hong Kong Sevens, then a trial run for graduation into the All Blacks, and obliterated the opposition.Months later, he lost his first two Tests in an All Blacks shirt against Les Bleus, with John Kirwan on the other flank before having to wait nearly a year to pull on the silver fern. New Zealand’s secret weapon.On the hoof: Jonah at his rampaging best against the Springboks in 2001What happened over the next six weeks in South Africa, not only changed Jonah’s life, irrevocably. It changed rugby. Legend has it that Rupert Murdoch, after watching Lomu swatting and steamrollering English defenders, made it his business to catapult rugby into the professional era, by offering an eye-watering sum to screen SANZAR games.While Kirwan had been a big man, at 6ft 4in and over 16st, Lomu was in the WWE ranks. He stood at 6ft 5in and weighed a shade under 19st. The problem for defenders is that he could also run like the wind. He was clocked at 10.7secs over 100 meaning he was virtually impossible to bring down single-handedly. As Bill McClaren famously said: “And there goes Jonah Lomu, proving once and for all that the shortest distance between two points is a straight line.”He scored seven tries in the tournament and was denied a World Cup winners medal only after a heroic defensive effort by the Springboks led by his old foe Joost van der Westhuizen. Legend of the game: Jonah was a colossus in rugby Despite a king’s ransom being dangled in front of him by NFL’s money men, Lomu stayed true to the All Blacks, going on to score 37 tries in just 63 appearances.Enduring image: Jonah plays one of his final Tests at Twickenham in 2002Lomu said recently that his health problems – he was diagnosed with a rare kidney disorder, nephrotic syndrome in his early twenties – meant he played rugby with the handbrake on. It makes you shudder to think what he could have achieved if fully fit.The world again regaled at Lomu’s freakish strength at the 1999 World Cup, where he scored eight tries, including a jaw-dropping individual effort against England, before the French dumped the All Blacks out of the Cup. One defining memory from that game stands out, however. Xavier Garbajosa, the French full-back, throwing himself out of the way, as if avoiding an oncoming freight train, as Lomu barrelled over. The tournament was a poorer place without him.By 2002, he had played his final Test for the All Blacks, at just 27, with his health slowly preventing him from playing at his peak of his powers.Inspiration: Jonah Lomu was idolised by the younger generationIn retirement, Lomu has spent time travelling, mentoring kids and acting as an unofficial ambassador for rugby. Loved and revered around the world, he was in the UK for a speaking tour only last month.Jonah’s untimely death, less than a year after another of New Zealand’s favourite son’s, Jerry Collins passed away will leave rugby with a heavy heart and thoughts must finally go out to his wife Nadene and boys Brayley, six, and Dhyreille, five. Jonah said in a recent interview that his goal was to see his boys into adulthood. Tragically, this will no longer happen, but we’re sure will be left in no doubt about the legacy their father has left in the coming years.Rugby is in mourning. Rest easy, big man.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The world’s first global rugby super star Jonah Lomu has died leaving the game shocked and saddenedlast_img read more

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Kieran Crowley during his Benetton reign (Getty Images) Crowley’s arrival follows the election of ex-Italy player Marzio Innocenti as FIR president.Innocenti said: “Kieran and I met in 1987 when we were playing at the first Rugby World Cup when Italy played New Zealand in the opening game. That day he didn’t come on against us, but it was destiny that his path would cross with Italy again, nearly 40 years later.“We’ve a lot of faith in him as a coach, and hold him in high esteem as a man, two key aspects to bring the national team back to the levels that our supporters and partners expect.” Kieran Crowley was today named as the head coach of Italy, taking over from Franco Smith – the South African will move into a new role as Italy’s head of high performance, overseeing rugby at every level.Crowley has been entrusted with leading Italy to the next Rugby World Cup and will be tasked with improving Italy’s dismal record in the Six Nations, with the Azzurri on a 32-match losing streak in the competition.The Kiwi, who won the Rugby World Cup with New Zealand as a player, has been in charge of Benetton Treviso since 2016, taking them to a first-ever Pro14 play-off appearance in that time, in 2019. His time with the club followed eight years as the head coach of the Canada men’s national team.The experienced coach will also take charge of Italy’s attack. Zebre’s Andrea Moretti will serve as his forwards coach, with defence coach Marius Goosen, Corrado Pilat and Giovanni Sanguin all in harness.Of the appointment Crowley said: “I’m honoured that the FIR have given me the opportunity to lead Italy to the next World Cup. In the five years with Benetton Rugby I’ve been able to learn and understand the country and its rugby culture, an understanding which I cannot wait to develop as head coach of the national team.“We have a talented young generation who have recently had their chance at international level and in the Pro14. Along with the more experienced members of the squad with whom we will work, they have all the quality necessary to form the spine of the Italy team for the next cycle.”center_img The Kiwi replaces Franco Smith, who becomes head of high performance Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Por Onell A. SotoPosted Dec 8, 2011 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rapidísimas, Diciembre 8 de 2011 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Episcopal News Service] La Liga Cubana Contra el Sida, que funciona fuera del control del gobierno de Cuba,  concedió su premio Solidaridad 2011 a los clérigos José Conrado y Yordi Alberto Toranzo, el primero católico romano y el segundo metodista y al Proyecto San Juan Eudes, de la Diócesis de Holguín. El premio distingue “a organizaciones o personalidades que promuevan la solidaridad hacia las personas con VIH-sida y muestren respeto a los derechos humanos”. También fue galardonada Leonila Hernández, esposa del presentador de televisión Tony Cortés, que estuvo retenida en Cuba hace pocas semanas.El 30 de noviembre en el parque de la Fraternidad en el centro de La Habana, tres mujeres del grupo Las Mambisas, desplegaron una tela enorme donde se podía leer: “Basta ya de mentiras y engaños al pueblo cubano. No al hambre, la miseria y la pobreza en Cuba”. Otras personas que les acompañaban gritaban “Leche y compota para los niños”, “que rebajen los precios”, “abusadores, basta de hambre”, “abajo el arroz a cinco pesos” y “libertad para el pueblo de Cuba”.  El acto de protesta duró 20 minutos.Líderes ecuménicos de varias iglesias de Brasil protestaron en la barriada de Santa Teresa en Río de Janeiro por el pésimo servicio de transporte en ese lugar que es fundamental para la vida de los residentes. El sistema de “trolleys” ha causado 8 muertos y 50 heridos en los últimos tres meses, según la agencia ALC de Buenos Aires.El gobierno de Paquistán ha compilado una lista de palabras que considera obscenas y ofensivas y ha ordenado a las empresas de telefonía móvil para que bloqueen textos que contengan esas palabras. Entre ellas se encuentran “condón”, “flatulencia” y “Jesucristo”.Elliot Sorge, en un tiempo obispo episcopal de Sao Paulo y la diócesis de Easton en Pensilvania, ha fallecido en Highland Ranch, Colorado, el 6 de diciembre a la edad de 83 años. Le sobreviven su esposa Marjorie y tres hijas, una de ellas presbítera episcopal. En Belem, Brasil, fue instrumento en la fundación de la Escuela John F. Kennedy.Los 33 países que componen la recién creada Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños (CELAC) expresaron “el más enérgico rechazo al ‘bloqueo’ de Estados Unidos  a Cuba” y pidieron a Estados Unidos que elimine esa medida coercitiva. La prensa de Miami no tardó en argumentar que el verdadero bloqueo es el que ejercen los hermanos Castro contra el pueblo cubano “eliminando todas las libertades ciudadanas” por más de 52 años.Una delegación ecuménica patrocinada por el Consejo Nacional de Iglesias de Estados Unidos visitó la semana pasada a Cuba. El grupo formado por líderes de las diferentes denominaciones se reunió con líderes de las iglesias locales, oficiales del gobierno cubano y dos de ellos visitaron al norteamericano Alan Gross, que cumple una condena acusado de espionaje.  Michael Kinnamon, líder del grupo, dijo a la prensa extranjera que confiaba que Gross sería puesto en libertad dada su enfermedad.Lady Gaga, la popular estrella pop, visitó el martes pasado la Casa Blanca para hablar sobre su trabajo en la prevención del acoso escolar tan frecuente en el país. La cantante se reunió con personal del gobierno de Barack Obama. La asesora del presidente Valerie Jarrett elogió a la estrella pop como “una fuente de fortaleza para muchas personas jóvenes que se sienten aisladas y asustadas en sus escuelas”. Se cree que en Estados Unidos hay unos 13 millones de niños que sufren del acoso de sus compañeros de estudios.La situación migratoria de millones de personas indocumentadas en Estados Unidos sigue siendo tema de debate ante las próximas elecciones del año que viene. Los candidatos están conscientes de la necesidad de una reforma migratoria pero todos sopesan el costo político que puede dañar sus aspiraciones. Muchos critican al presidente Barack Obama  por no haber cumplido con su promesa de campaña. La televisión de habla española dedica largos espacios que muestran verdaderas tragedias familiares, así como abusos de las autoridades. Todos los políticos están conscientes de que sin el voto hispano no podrán ganar las elecciones a todos los niveles de la estructura legislativa.El gobierno de Alabama estudia emplear presos comunes para compensar la escasez de mano de obra agrícola atribuida a la nueva ley estatal contra la inmigración ilegal. Se acerca la temporada de siembra y muchos agricultores han perdido a la mayoría de sus empleados.PARA PENSAR: No importa cuánto dura la vida, ni cuán rápido pasa. Lo trascendente es lo que hacemos con ella. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Posted May 29, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Para la elección del Presidente y Vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [Oficial de Asuntos Públicos] Bonnie Anderson presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados de la Iglesia Episcopal ha emitido la siguiente carta a los diputados y primeros suplentes.El siguiente es el texto de la carta:24 mayo de 2012Para la elección del Presidente y Vicepresidente de la Cámara de DiputadosEstimados amigos:Yo serviré como Presidenta de la Cámara de Diputados hasta la clausura de esta 77ª Convención General el 12 de julio.El cargo de Vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados está ahora vacante. En la sesión de organización de la Cámara de Diputados el 5 de julio, la Cámara elegirá un  Vicepresidente para servir en la presente Convención. El Diputado Scott Kirby, Diócesis de Eau Claire, se ha comprometido a ser nominado para el cargo de Vicepresidente. Otras personas también pueden ser propuestas en el Seno de la Cámara. Si es elegido el Diputado Kirby, ha indicado que no va a presentarse a las elecciones para cualquier cargo para el próximo trienio.La Cámara elegirá a un Presidente y a un Vicepresidente para servir a partir del 12 de julio después de la clausura de esta 77ª Convención General. Canon I.1.1 (b)Para facilitar estas elecciones, voy a pedir al Comité de Labor Parlamentaria que presente el siguiente calendario para órdenes especiales de los asuntos:• El 4º día legislativo, 8 de julio, se recibirán nominaciones desde el Seno de la Cámara para el cargo de Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados.• El 5º día legislativo, 9 de julio, la Cámara de Diputados elegirá al 32º Presidente de laCámara de Diputados.• El 6º día legislativo, 10 de julio, se recibirán nominaciones desde el Seno para el cargo de Vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados. El Vicepresidente debe ser de un orden diferente que el Presidente electo.• El 7º día legislativo, 11 de julio, la Cámara de Diputados elegirá al Vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados.El Presidente electo y el Vicepresidente electo asumirán el cargo al momento de la clausura de la session ordinaria de la Cámara de Diputados en la que hayan sido elegidos y continuarán en sus cargos hasta la clausura de la próxima reunión ordinaria de la Convención General. El Presidente y el Vicepresidente tienen derecho a presentarse a las elecciones de tres plazos en cada cargo.Paz,Bonnie Anderson, D.D.Presidenta de la Cámara de Diputados Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 23, 2017 Richard Warren says: Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 23, 2017 at 8:38 pm First, after eight years of his presidency, you might at least know that President Obama’s first name is Barack, not Barrack. Second, I, too, pray that the Holy Spirit may guide President Trump and his administration toward a humane, reasoned and balanced response to the needs and legitimate concerns of all the people of the United States and the larger world–not just his followers and financial supporters. James Stickton says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 January 23, 2017 at 10:33 am We pray. For all. Unceasingly. For all. January 24, 2017 at 6:44 pm Our mission statement of the episcopal diocese of Atlanta is “Love like Jesus” so it seems to me that means to love everybody, including our enemies or ones we don’t like. I think no thought shoutout even given to whether we name Donald Trump in our POP. HE NEED AS MANY PRAYERS AS WE CAN GIVE HIM. After presidential power shifts, Episcopalians ask: How should we pray? Debating purpose, intention of praying for Donald Trump in church Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA January 24, 2017 at 2:08 pm Will anyone be praying for the continued recovery and life of George Bush the first ? January 23, 2017 at 7:02 pm Pray for President Donald Trump by name? You bet! I despise his racist and misogynistic statements to the press. His treatment of women characterization of menus dispicable. I see an unrivalled arrogance that bespeaks a dangerous insecurity. But pray for him by name. All of us stand in need of continued transformation. If God can love then certainly Donald Trump. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Jan rigsby says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 23, 2017 at 5:40 pm How do we pray for THIS president? The same way we’ve prayed for all presidents and world leaders, whether we agreed with them or not. We pray for God to guide them to have the wisdom to make wise decisions, the strength to make difficult decisions and carry them out, the courage to stand strong against evil and corruption, the compassion to care about the welfare of all. This is how I prayed for the last president even though I disagreed with every decision he made, including his decision for the twenty-two years before coming to the White House to sit in a church in front of a clergyperson who spewed venom and hatred, and his decision NOT to attend church during his presidency. This, to me, is not Christianity.This president plans to serve God by making America strong again. Because we are only human and not also divine as was Jesus, we must lead from a position of strength to encourage those countries that have no respect for human rights to do better for all people. This president wants to make America a better place for all by keeping businesses in business, thus ensuring jobs and salaries that will allow people here to care for themselves and their families with dignity rather than demeaning them by expecting them to exist on money taken from those who are working. This president wants all people in each nation to be able to be proud of their own successful nations by taking care of themselves rather than expecting to be taken care of. As a Christian who believes that Jesus Christ is the Way, I am most excited that THIS president intends to restore respect for Christianity rather than apologizing for his Christian beliefs and our nation’s Judeo-Christian heritage. We respect other faiths, but I do not respect an ideology that endorses abuse of women, children, homosexuals, and anyone who does not believe in exactly the same ideology as it does and even promotes killing those individuals.When America is strong and secure again, we the people will have the ability to then turn our attention outward again. But until we can take care of ourselves, we cannot take care of others. Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 24, 2017 at 1:12 pm Please find it in your heart to forgive me for a typo. I, alas, am not perfect. Comments (25) The Book of Common Prayer calls for Episcopalians to pray for the nation and those in authority (page 359). Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] When Bishop Jeff Lee wrote to Episcopalians in the Diocese of Chicago after the November election, he asked that they pray for Donald Trump, as well as all elected officials and for the church.One recipient asked him to stop telling people to admire the president-elect. Such admiration was not what Lee was after, but only prayer, he told the recipient. Yet, he said in an interview with Episcopal News Service, the person’s reaction gave him a clue about the intensity of the reactions to Trump’s election.The dialogue between Lee and a member of his diocese is not an isolated incident. Since Trump’s election in November, many Episcopalians have asked what it means to pray for the 45th U.S. president during public worship, how to do it, and, for some, even whether to offer such prayers at all.For some Episcopalians, there is no debate: they will pray for Trump whether they are happy to have him as president or not. While some congregations that are in the habit of praying for the president by name might end that practice; for others, it is a foregone conclusion that such specificity will continue.In social media and congregational discussions, other Episcopalians make the distinction between praying for the office of the president, not the individual. Some say that they cannot abide Trump being named in the liturgy because hearing his name triggers trauma for some congregants considering his past sexual, misogynist and racial comments, and general behavior during the campaign and since. Still others say that one cannot separate praying for the office and the officeholder; they know who is in that office whether or not they name him.Does praying for the president imply blessing, commending or accepting that person’s behavior or politics, others wonder. Or is praying for God to guide this incoming president or any president exactly what Christians ought to be doing?What the Book of Common Prayer and the Bible sayThe Book of Common Prayer is clear, in as far as it goes. The second of the six rubrics that standardize the Prayers of the People in the Rite II Eucharistic liturgy (page 359) requires petitions for “the Nation and all in authority.” The rubrics do not require leaders to be prayed for by name.Of the six suggested Rite II forms for those prayers, only a bidding in Form I makes specific mention of “our President.” Form V is the only one that gives an option of praying for “those in positions of public trust” by name.Holy Eucharist Rite I’s single Prayers of the People form gives the option of praying by name for “those who bear the authority of government.”Presumably, congregations that adapt the prayer book’s forms or use other forms for the Prayers of the People follow the categories listed in the prayer book rubrics.The Book of Common Prayer also contains prayers for use in any liturgy or for private prayer, including nine “Prayers for National Life” (pages 821-823) and two “Thanksgivings for National Life” (pages 838-839).The first of the six forms of the Prayers of the People in Rite II’s Eucharistic liturgy includes a petition for the president (page 384). Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceMany Episcopalians root their Prayers of the People decisions in Scripture. They reference Matthew 5:43-48 in which Jesus tells his followers to “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.”They also cite Paul’s admonition to the Romans not to be overcome by evil but to overcome evil with good (Romans 12:21), as well as the next verse (Romans 13:1) in which Paul says Christians should obey “the governing authorities.” Some point to 1 Timothy 2:1-4 in which the author calls on Christians to pray for “kings and all who are in high positions.”Is this a test?A thread running through many of these discussions is whether this prayer debate is a test of Episcopalians’ faithfulness to the Gospel.“This is when religion gets real,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry told Episcopal News Service in a recent interview. When facing questions such as this, Curry said Christians must confront their understanding of their identity in Christ.“If we are living into being a part of the movement of Jesus of Nazareth, following his footsteps and his spirit, his way; if that’s who we are; and, if that’s what baptism is about, then I’ve got to be better than myself even when I don’t want to be,” he said, including honoring the scriptural imperative to pray for those who have wronged you, or worse.“When we are praying for Donald or Barack … we’re praying for their well-being, to be sure as people, but we’re praying for their leadership; that they will lead in justice, that they will lead in goodness,” he said.The fifth of the six forms of the Rite II Prayers of the People includes an option to name “those in positions of public trust” (page 390). Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Rev. Devon Anderson, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Excelsior, Minnesota, told ENS that the debate over the Prayers of the People also goes to the heart of Anglican/Episcopal theology about corporate prayer.“When we come to the altar to pray on Sunday morning, we pray with one voice. We pray the same words, we sing the same hymns, we cup our hands and receive the same bread. Most importantly, we pray for justice,” Anderson said. “Even the prayers that pray for our elected leaders by name have within them prayers for justice.”Those prayers call upon elected officials to work for the common good with an eye toward justice and a preference for the poor, she said. “All leaders – no matter their platform, fallibilities, exploits, abuses or policies – are in need of those prayers,” Anderson added.Praying or protesting?Curry told ENS that praying for leaders and challenging them to change are not mutually exclusive. “I grew up having to pray for leaders that were encouraging Jim Crow segregation and I was the one being segregated, but we did it anyway,” he said.During the civil rights movement, Curry said, people “prayed and protested at the same time.”“We got on our knees in church and prayed for them, and then we got up off our knees and we marched on Washington,” he said.Jack Douglas said he has prayed daily for previous presidents and he will pray for Trump. “This does not mean that I won’t criticize,” wrote Douglas, who lives in Fayetteville, Arkansas. “I’ll always criticize, but I’ll also pray.”Anderson, who also chairs the Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music, believes “church communities must model the kind of justice and engagement we are demanding of our elected leaders,” starting “with corporate prayer which inspires prophetic witness and ministry in our communities on behalf of marginalized people.”While she understands the impulse of a faith community that is unified in its political ideology to refuse to pray for the president by name, Anderson said she serves “a politically diverse congregation that is not of one mind politically.” It also has a 28-year refugee resettlement ministry, a long-standing partnership with indigenous communities and a commitment to racial reconciliation.“We have to be very careful to continue to offer corporate worship that unifies us rather than divides. We will continue to pray for our elected leaders (by name) when the Book of Common Prayer calls for it,” she said. “To me, that is an act of resistance against division.”Trinity also will redouble its outreach efforts in the coming days and years “because the Gospel calls us to those ministries,” she said.The traditionally worded Rite I Eucharistic liturgy gives the option of praying by name for those “who bear the authority of government” (page 329). Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceFor Anderson, the question “is way deeper than proper names in Prayers of the People.”“The question is: How far are we willing to go to help bring about what we are praying for? How much of our hearts (and our time and our resources) are set on the real work and engagement it will take to set things that are wrong in our country, right again?” she told ENS.What’s in a name?The Rev. Elizabeth Kaeton, a longtime activist inside and outside the Episcopal Church who works as a hospice chaplain in Delaware, cannot countenance praying for Trump by name during the liturgy. Praying for Trump by name is different than publicly praying for Barack Obama or George W. Bush, she told ENS.“He has said things that are at odds with the founding principles of this nation: freedom and justice for all. He does not ascribe to that,” Kaeton said, adding that she sees no evidence that Trump respects the dignity of every human being or seeks to serve Christ in all people as the Baptismal Covenant calls for.“How do we as a corporate body pray for someone who is antithetical to our country and our Christian beliefs without at least having a conversation about what that means?” she asked.A recent discussion on ENS’ Facebook page exemplified the division this question raises. For example, Judy Schroder Niederman wrote that, because of how she said Trump “ridicules and bullies others, how he lies, how he threatens,” she “cannot and will not utter that man’s name. Not yet emotionally able to pray for him. I will pray for the office of the presidency.”Alynn Beimford replied, saying for eight years she could not invoke Barack Obama’s name during worship but will “joyfully” use Trump’s.The Rev. Mike Kinman, rector of All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, California, cited the reaction that Trump’s name stirs in some people in his decision to have the parish stop praying for the president by name.“We are rightly charged with praying for our leaders,” Kinman wrote. “But we are also charged with keeping the worshipping community, while certainly not challenge-free, a place of safety from harm.”Kinman likened praying for Trump to requiring an abused woman to pray by name for the person who abused her. “It’s not that the abuser doesn’t need prayer – certainly the opposite – but prayer should never be a trauma-causing act,” he said.He pledged to listen to the congregation and pray about his decision.Kaeton said she hopes this debate “opens up a discussion in congregations as well as nationally about prayer, about the efficacy and the purpose of prayer, and the difference between private prayer and public prayer.”“I hope it gets congregations looking at what they’re doing in their liturgy, and how they’re praying the Prayers of the People and who decides that. Are we just acquiescing to what clergy say?”The Great Litany (page 148), which many Episcopal congregations will use on the First Sunday in Lent, includes a petition for the U.S. president and is specific about the prayer’s intention. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Rev. Michael Arase-Barham, vicar of Holy Family Episcopal Church in Half Moon Bay, California, and Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in nearby Belmont, agreed such a discussion is necessary.“My immediate instinct is to say I am fascinated that we are talking about whether or not we should be praying instead of praying together,” he told ENS. “However, part of the problem is that, perhaps, we haven’t talked enough about how to pray for our enemies. It’s harder to start praying for your enemies when you have them and it is no longer theoretical.”Following the conversations on social media, Arase-Barham said he has been struck by “how easily we can look down our noses at each other about this. It seems me that prayer ought to be making all of us a little more humble and open towards one another. In some ways, we’re making enemies of our friends on Facebook.”“How can we pray for Trump if we can’t discuss this civilly and spiritually?” he asked.The mysteriously transforming power of prayerArase-Barham suggested congregations ought to talk about the reality that the petitions in the Prayers of the People leave enough room for an individual’s intentions to join with other voices in the praying body. For instance, he said, he focused on different things while praying for George W. Bush or Barack Obama during the liturgy.“The spirit is still able to work in each person in that room praying that prayer, and God is able to work in spite of our desired outcomes through us and through that prayer,” Arase-Barham said.Curry told ENS “to pray for those who are in leadership is to actually unleash energy that absolutely has its source in God and that may touch the human spirit in some way.”The prayer is “not avoiding the reality” for the issues involved but, he said, “it’s actually going deeper; it has a way of freeing the person who is praying from the destructive power of a destructive relationship.”An optional version of the Great Litany found in the authorized “Enriching Our Worship” series includes petitions for all three branches of the U.S. government, and calls for naming the president. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Rev. Kim Hobby, pastor of Christ Church Episcopal in South Pittsburg, Tennessee, was among those commenting on the ENS website about the nature of prayer. “Prayer changes things, and the first thing it changes is the one who prays,” she wrote. “True prayer changes our hearts of fear and hatred to hearts of courage and love, despite our human instincts. I pray that the hearts of all our leaders, including the president-elect, will be opened to see, hear, and respond compassionately and respectfully to all people at all times and in all places.”Lee, the bishop of Chicago, would agree. “Prayer is, first and foremost, not about asking God to rearrange the universe according to my specifications, but asking God to rearrange me,” he told ENS.In an interview with ENS, the Very Rev. Randolph Hollerith, dean of Washington National Cathedral, said Episcopalians “don’t look at prayer as magic.”“Our prayers are our way of trying to align ourselves to God and to focus ourselves a little bit more into what God may want for us,” he said. “If I believe that God loves every human being to their core; that God loves every human being infinitely, then how can I just pray for those people I agree with when I know that God loves that person I disagree with to a depth I can’t even understand?”Read more about itTime magazine has published Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s “Why We Must Pray for Donald Trump.”Diocese of Vermont Bishop Tom Ely has issued “A Statement in Support of Prayer & Reconciliation.”Diocese of Missouri Bishop Wayne Smith has written a blog post “Praying for a president by name.”The Very Rev. Michael Sniffen, dean of Cathedral of the Incarnation in Garden City, New York, has written “Prayers for the President: What’s in a Name?”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. January 23, 2017 at 9:44 pm Well said. It is sad when we become so divided that we can not recall how those who chose not to accept our current election, chastised those who would not accept out first female PB and those that refused to pray for her. I was taught as a youth that Episcopalians were the via media and we accepted all persons. We have seen major splits in our society, including TEC, and seem to have forgotten or lost God in the process of doing our will. I pray PB Curry can lead us back to our true mission of proclamation of God’s word. January 24, 2017 at 3:27 pm I was raised Baptist, so liturgy , including prayers by by name for the President was not part of my experience. I understand the theology behind the act, but have always sensed an element of supporting the status quo in the actual performance. . It has been suggested that one can both pray and protest. Makes sense, but realistically, will it happen for more than a few? I fear the overall effect of the ritual will be to legitimize actions we would not rationally defend. On Monday, Trump again said it was unfortunate that we did not take the oil when we invaded Iraq, which would have been a war crime. He also implied that it might still be possible. I think these are serious times, and we will need not only theology but reason, especially in the form of an understanding of history, to guide us. Ronald Davin says: Faith & Politics January 23, 2017 at 4:08 pm Amen. I Virginia we’ve had the double whammy of Barrack as well as Governor Terry McCauliffe, perhaps the most odious occupant of that office in the history of the Commonwealth. In both cases a double-dose of prayer is a good idea! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH January 23, 2017 at 8:32 pm Dr. Flint,He may be your President but he’s not mine, Donald Trump tainted and illegitimate because of his campaign’s association with Mr. Putin and the Russian government. Mr. Obama is a decent man, more than I can say about his successor. January 24, 2017 at 7:42 pm Do we pray for the Devil by name? Ron Bryant says: Ronald Davin says: Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 1, 2017 at 4:55 pm As the president of the USA, and one of the most important leaders in the world, how can we justify NOT praying for him. Is he and all the responsibility he carries somehow not worthy of prayers? That is a very dangerous slope to start down. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Frances Gresley says: Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC January 24, 2017 at 6:51 pm Our mission statement of the episcopal diocese of Atlanta is “Love like Jesus” so it seems to me that means to love everybody, including our enemies or ones we don’t like. I think no thought should even be given to whether we name Donald Trump in our POP. HE NEED AS MANY PRAYERS AS WE CAN GIVE HIM. H Linda King White says: Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books January 28, 2017 at 7:39 am The former president’s name is spelled “Barack.” January 27, 2017 at 2:24 pm In our parish, we use a version of the prayers that simply states we pray for all who govern… no specific names needed as God knows for whom we pray. Since we did not name any of our previous two Presidents, naming one now would be inconsistent. January 23, 2017 at 10:40 pm If my Lord and Savior walked the earth today, I’m sure he would associate and pray with our Commander and Chief, Donald Trump. What gives us the right to discriminate as Christians, who we pray for. I feel sorry for those who refuse to speak his name in prayer. Whether they voted for him or not, it’s time to pray he does a good job,for the future of our country. Steven Van Pelt says: Charles Jett says: Dale Peterson says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY walter woodson says: Stuart Kenworthy says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA walter woodson says: Debra Goebel says: Karen G. Frost says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab January 23, 2017 at 1:44 pm Considering I have endured 8 years of hearing Barrack, our President, in The Prayers of the People. I never voted for him and oppose a large number of his policies, but I stayed in my seat as The Prayers of the People were read. Now, the time has come for my fellow Episcopalians, to show the same courtesy to Donald, our President, as I did for Barrack. When the Church refuses to pray for an individual then it no longer is the Church of Jesus. Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Howard Stringfellow says: Submit a Job Listing Pamela Payne says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME January 23, 2017 at 7:17 pm I believe that the point of the Prayers of the People is to call all of us as Episcopalian Christians to follow the leading of the Holy Spirit and to walk in the imitation of Christ. I did not vote for Donald Trump, but I will pray for him and for the leaders of our nation, that they, and we, will hear and respond to the call of Christ to see the Christ in others. And maybe, by so doing, we can help bring a better focus to this divided nation, to walk in love, to care for the poor and the marginalized, and to live Jesus’ call in Matthew 25. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Marcia P Ebert says: January 23, 2017 at 2:29 pm Well said Dr Flint.But should we consider what a noted Episcopalian said in even more distressing times.“But I have never cherished toward them bitter or vindictive feelings, and have never seen the day when I did not pray for them.” Robert E Lee Can we do no less ? Margaret Nolde says: January 24, 2017 at 9:56 am I am so surprised that there are questions by Christians as to the purpose of praying for the President. Did they not ever ponder “Love your enemies”, “Pray for those who persecute you”? On a concrete level, does not a prison ministry reach out to criminals?I am also puzzled by the assumptions that all Episcopalians are of one party. Divetsoty and acceptance is the hallmark of the Episcopal Church. As a church, we are always striving and struggling to love all. I would encourage everyone who struggles to pray for our President to think beyond personal feelings and temporary distress and, instead, contemplate how to follow Jesus and live out our baptismal promises when an election doesn’t go our way. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Stephen Whitney-Wise says: Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Frances Gresley says: January 26, 2017 at 12:01 am I understand that people will be traumatized speaking the name of their persecutor in prayer. I can only speak for myself. Three of my children are not heterosexual, one is disabled. I am very concerned for their safety and wellbeing under this administration. For me, however, speaking President Trump’s name in prayer, knowing that Christ and all the company of heaven pray with me, empowers me and strengthens me. For me, speaking his name in my prayers is an act of defiance against his perceived power over us…and an acknowledgement of God’s omnipotence…because with all the power President Trump has, he will never have the power to separate us from the love of God. Rector Tampa, FL Donald Churchill says: January 30, 2017 at 12:23 pm Is there a difference in praying for “our President” and “the President”? Mary Hooper says: Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR January 23, 2017 at 8:55 pm Agree with the president our not, it is inherently disrespectful to refer to person holding the office by last name alone. I’m embarrassed and ashamed of the absence of reason exhibited in the official and casual declarations being made in the name of the Church and of faithfulness to the gospel. Little discourse and an abundance of self-righteous judgmental proclamation based on superficial politically partisan rhetoric. Nominally Christian, at best. Pharisaical hypocrisy at worst. Sad. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET January 25, 2017 at 1:21 pm Thank you to all who have taken the time to respond to what is, for many, a challenging situation. I was so disheartened, eight years ago, when prominent Republicans and conservatives saw it as there duty to work so that President Obama would fail. Although I cannot support President Trump’s behavior, I cannot wish that he fail; and so I will join in the voices at my parish in praying for our president, that he work for justice and peace in the world.last_img read more

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Anglican Communion News Service] In a rare political intervention, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has explicitly criticized the U.S. President Donald Trump for retweeting anti-Muslim videos posted by a British far-right extremist group. Welby said “it is deeply disturbing that the President of the United States has chosen to amplify the voice of far-right extremists.” The U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May also criticised the U.S. president, but was slapped down by Mr. Trump, who told her to “focus on the destructive Radical Islamic Terrorism.”Read the full article here. Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Faith & Politics Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest December 1, 2017 at 10:47 am Thank you for speaking out against this shameful behavior —The US A Beacon of Hope / An example of a Higher Standard? Unfortunately NOT under this President— TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls December 1, 2017 at 8:27 am Thank you to the Archbishop of Canterbury for his statement criticizing the retweeting of anti-Muslim videos. (I am a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, Janesville, WI, USA, and do not agree with our “president” and did not vote for him.) I am much encouraged by the love of the Episcopal church here and the Archbishop of Canterbury in many aspects, but especially now this statement which has gone out to the world. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Sarah Tyriver says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (3) Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York December 4, 2017 at 11:31 am Thank you, Archbishop, for exercising your moral authority to question the wisdom of Mr. Trump’s tweet. I believe your statement will encourage other people of faith to speak out and not stand by as observers to the outrageous and often racist comments of the President. Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Margaret B. Smith says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Donald Trump, Rector Collierville, TN Sherri Frances says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Archbishop of Canterbury, Archbishop of Canterbury intervenes in Anglo-American diplomatic Twitter row Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Posted Nov 30, 2017 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more